Active student participation in curriculum design: lessons from a first year curriculum design project and from the literature.



Bovill, C and Morss, K and Bulley, Catherine Active student participation in curriculum design: lessons from a first year curriculum design project and from the literature. In: 2nd International Pedagogical Research in Higher Education (PRHE) Conference: Curriculum Change for Learning, 16-17 June 2008, Liverpool Hope University, UK. (Unpublished)

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract

This paper outlines some of the findings from a QAA (Scotland) funded project exploring first year curriculum design (Bovill et al. 2008). In gathering case studies of innovative first year curriculum design from higher education institutions, few examples were given of active student participation in the design process. In the current higher education context where student engagement in learning is emphasised (Carini et al, 2006), this paper asks more generally whether students should be actively participating in curriculum design. In order to answer this question, several elements of the project findings are interrogated: student views gathered in focus groups; staff views collected in workshops; and the case studies where students were actively involved in curriculum design. These findings are examined for lessons that inform the debate about whether students should be participating in curriculum design, in first year and at other levels. Alongside these findings, relevant literature is critiqued in order to ascertain the desirability and feasibility of adopting curriculum design approaches that offer opportunities for active student participation. Student participation in curriculum design implies a number of shifts from traditional curriculum planning processes including: students’ voices entering a planning process that has traditionally been the domain of academics and curriculum planners; greater control by students over design that influences their own learning experiences; and making explicit both student and tutor expectations of the curriculum and its relationship to learning. All of these examples imply modification of the way curricula are designed, with concomitant changes in students’ learning experiences.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Lecture)
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Physiotherapy
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2010 09:47
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2010 11:49
URI: http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/1936

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item