Evaluation of micronutrient intakes of children and adolescents: National Nutrition Survey 1995 and comparison with 1985 data.



Magarey, Anthea and Bannerman, Elaine Evaluation of micronutrient intakes of children and adolescents: National Nutrition Survey 1995 and comparison with 1985 data. Nutrition & Dietetics, 60 (1). pp. 16-22. ISSN 1446-6368

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Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the vitamin and mineral intakes of two to 18-year-old participants in the National Nutrition Survey 1995 (NNS95) against recommended dietary intakes (RDTs) and a previous national survey (1985) of ten to 15-year-olds. Design: Secondary analysis of the NNS95. Subjects: Nationally representative sample of 3007 two to 18-year-olds surveyed in the NNS95. Main outcome measures: Percentage of subjects in each of five age groups by sex with nutrient intakes < 0.7 RDI. Statistical analysis: Data were adjusted for non-respondents and day-to-day variation using weighting and correction factors respectively, provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Descriptive statistics and Pearson's chi-square tests for comparisons by age and sex and between 1995 and 1985. Results: Among two to 1 1-year-olds calcium was the only nutrient for which more than 6% subjects had intakes < 0.7 RDI. In 12 to 18-year-old males more than 10% had intakes of vitamin A and calcium < 0.7 RDI, and in females intakes of these two nutrients plus iron, magnesium, zinc and phosphorus were < 0.7 RDI in between 12% and 50% of subjects. Among 12 to 18-year-olds, 5% males and 23% females had three or more nutrient intakes < 0.7 RDI. Subjects who had nutrient intakes < 0.7 RDI ate less food but also food of lower nutrient density. The proportions of subjects with intakes < 0.7 RDI were similar to 1985. Conclusion: Many adolescents, particularly females are at risk of inadequate micronutrient intakes which may put them at risk of disease. Food and nutrient intake of children and adolescents must continue to be monitored in order to guide the development of appropriate health promotion strategies with the potential to reduce future disease burden.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Dietetics, Nutrition and Biological Sciences
Date Deposited: 18 Jan 2011 10:45
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2014 12:58
URI: http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2090

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