HRD as a social & discursive construct : exploring the significance of culture in HRD discourse



Garavan, T and O'Donnell, D and McGuire, David and Murphy, J (2001) HRD as a social & discursive construct : exploring the significance of culture in HRD discourse. In: Second Conference on HRD Research and Practice Across Europe 2001, 26/27 January 2001, Enschede, The Netherlands. (Submitted)

[img]
Preview
PDF
235.pdf

Download (173kB)

Abstract

Despite the rapid growth of interest in HRD as a potential source of organisational advantage, its development as a body of knowledge has been stymied by a lack of attention to the fundamental principles giving HRD its philosophical base. Much of the debate has centred on the dualism of the learning or performance orientation of HRD. While some research exists examining the role of culture in the areas of recruitment, organisational socialisation and training transfer, there is a critical lack of theoretical rigour and research related to the impact of cultural issues in the HRD field. Drawing on discourse analysis this working paper initiates a critical examination of the role of culture in HRD discourse from an interpretivist and social constructionist perspective.The growth of interest by organisations in HRD as a potential source of organisational advantage and its development as a body of knowledge has been undermined by a lack of attention to the fundamental principles from whence HRD draws its philosophical base (Barrie & Pace 1998; Anderson 1995; Boxall 1993; Blyton & Turnbull 1992; Butler 1991; Watkins 1991). Much of the debate has centred on the dualism of learning and performance orientation and the influence of other variables, in particular culture has been largely under-researched (Kuchinke, 1999, 1998). While research examines the role of culture in recruitment, organisational socialisation and training transfer (Huo & Von Glinow 1995; Lawrence 1994; Sparrow & Wu 1998), there is a lack of theoretical rigour and research relating to the influence of culture on HRD (Ashton et al. 2000; Hansen & Brook 1994; Kuchinke 1999; Maurice et al. 1986; McLean 1991; Peterson 1997; Saha, 1995). Drawing on discourse analysis this working paper tentatively initiates a critical examination of the role of culture in HRD discourse from an interpretivist and social constructionist perspective. Its purpose is to question the dominance of managerialist discourse and to surface some of its taken for granted assumptions.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Divisions: School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management > Business, Enterprise & Management
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2009 14:20
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2014 12:54
URI: http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/235

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item