Impact of using the Model of Human Occupation: A survey of occupational therapy mental health practitioners' perceptions



Lee, S W and Kielhofner, G and Morley, M and Heasman, D and Garnham, M and Willis, S and Parkinson, S and Forsyth, Kirsty and Melton, J and Taylor, R R (2012) Impact of using the Model of Human Occupation: A survey of occupational therapy mental health practitioners' perceptions. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 19 (5). pp. 450-456. ISSN 11038128

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Abstract

Aim: While little is known about how occupational therapists perceive the use of occupation-focused theory in their practice, evidence indicates that it has been called for in the profession. To date, the Model of Human Occupation (MOHO) is the most widely used model internationally. The aim of this study is to document practitioners' perceptions of how using MOHO impacted on their practice. Methods: A descriptive study using an Internet-based survey study design was conducted with 429 therapists in six National Health Service (NHS) trusts in the UK. Results: Of the 429 therapists, 262 completed the survey, for a response rate of 61.07%. Most were female (85.5%) with a varying range of years of experience. Most worked in community and/or inpatient mental health settings; 92.1% responded that they use MOHO as their primary model. Therapists reported using MOHO moderately to greatly improve their assessment, goal setting, and conduct of relevant interventions as well as professional identity as an OT in their mental health occupational therapy practice. Conclusion/Implications: This study examined therapists' perceived impact of using an occupation-focused model in mental health practice. The findings of this study provided promising results. Findings suggest that the utilization of MOHO increases service for clients and professional stature and identity for therapists. © 2012 Informa Healthcare.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Occupational Therapy and Arts Therapies
Date Deposited: 10 Sep 2012 13:21
Last Modified: 10 Sep 2012 13:21
URI: http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2910

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