Congruency and responsiveness of perceived exertion and time-to-end-point during an intermittent isometric fatigue task



Shepherd, J and Gleeson, Nigel and Minshull, Claire (2013) Congruency and responsiveness of perceived exertion and time-to-end-point during an intermittent isometric fatigue task. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 113 (4). pp. 905-909. ISSN 1439-6319

[img] PDF
eResearch_2951.pdf
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (217kB) | Request a copy

Abstract

The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the relationship between self-perception of effort and task duration in an intermittent isometric fatigue trial (IIF) and (2) to evaluate the capability of two assessment paradigms (perceived exertion; perceived task duration) to reflect changes in IIF intensity. Fifteen participants performed two IIF tasks of the knee extensors at intensities of 60 and 70 % of daily peak force, each separated by 48-72 h. Ordering of the tasks was counter-balanced and participants were blinded to the precise intensity of each IIF. A category-ratio scale (CR-10) and visual analogue scale were used during each IIF task to record measures of perceived exertion and perceived task duration, respectively. Measures were recorded at 10 % intervals across the relative duration of each IIF task. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients revealed strong positive correlations (r > 0.99; p < 0.01) between completed task duration and both perceptual scales at the two IIF intensities. Separate two-way repeated measures ANOVAs of CR-10 and perceived task duration responses revealed significant main effects for time only (F [2.2,30.1] = 126.8; p < 0.001; F [2.6,36.8] = 117.2; p < 0.001, CR-10 and perceived task duration, respectively). The results suggest that perceived exertion and perceived task duration are equally effective predictors of IIF end-point. However, neither measure was sufficiently responsive to discriminate between 10 % changes in exercise intensity. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Physiotherapy
Date Deposited: 02 Oct 2012 10:51
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2014 13:00
URI: http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/2951

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item