How to do (or not to do) : designing a discrete choice experiment for application in a low-income country



Mangham, L.J. and Hanson, Kara and McPake, Barbara (2008) How to do (or not to do) : designing a discrete choice experiment for application in a low-income country. Health Policy and Planning, 24 (2). pp. 151-158. ISSN 02681080

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Abstract

Understanding the preferences of patients and health professionals is useful for health policy and planning. Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are a quantitative technique for eliciting preferences that can be used in the absence of revealed preference data. The method involves asking individuals to state their preference over hypothetical alternative scenarios, goods or services. Each alternative is described by several attributes and the responses are used to determine whether preferences are significantly influenced by the attributes and also their relative importance. DCEs are widely used in high-income contexts and are increasingly being applied in low- and middle-income countries to consider a range of policy concerns. This paper aims to provide an introduction to DCEs for policy-makers and researchers with little knowledge of the technique. We outline the stages involved in undertaking a DCE, with an emphasis on the design considerations applicable in a low-income setting.

Item Type: Article
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > The Institute for International Health and Development
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2009 14:41
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2014 12:55
URI: http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/352

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