Use of a renal-specific oral supplement by haemodialysis patients with low protein intake does not increase the need for phosphate binders and may prevent a decline in nutritional status and quality of life



Fouque, D and McKenzie, Jane and de Mutsert, R and Azar, R and Teta, D and Plauth, M and Cano, N (2008) Use of a renal-specific oral supplement by haemodialysis patients with low protein intake does not increase the need for phosphate binders and may prevent a decline in nutritional status and quality of life. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 23 (9). pp. 2902-2910. ISSN 0931-0509

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Abstract

Background. Protein-energy wasting is a frequent and debilitating condition in maintenance dialysis. We randomly tested if an energy-dense, phosphate-restricted, renal-specific oral supplement couldmaintain adequate nutritional intake and prevent malnutrition in maintenance haemodialysis patients with insufficient intake. Methods. Eighty-six patients were assigned to a standard care (CTRL) group or were prescribed two 125-ml packs of Renilon 7.5 R daily for 3 months (SUPP). Dietary intake, serum (S) albumin, prealbumin, protein nitrogen appearance(nPNA), C-reactive protein, subjective global assessment(SGA) and quality of life (QOL) were recorded at baseline and after 3 months. Results. While intention to treat analysis (ITT) did not reveal strong statistically significant changes in dietary intake between groups, per protocol (PP) analysis showed that theSUPP group increased protein (P < 0.01) and energy (P <0.01) intakes. In contrast, protein and energy intakes further deteriorated in the CTRL group (PP). Although there was no difference in serum albumin and prealbumin changes between groups, in the total population serum albumin and prealbumin changes were positively associated with the increment in protein intake (r = 0.29, P = 0.01 and r = 0.27, P = 0.02, respectively). The SUPP group did not increase phosphate intake, phosphataemia remained unaffected, and the use of phosphate binders remained stable or decreased. The SUPP group exhibited improved SGA and QOL (P < 0.05). Conclusion. This study shows that providing maintenance haemodialysis patientswith insufficient intake with a renal- specific oral supplement may prevent deterioration in nutritional indices and QOL without increasing the need for phosphate binders.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: albumin; compliance; haemodialysis; malnutrition; oral supplement
Divisions: School of Health Sciences > Dietetics, Nutrition and Biological Sciences
Date Deposited: 13 Oct 2009 14:48
Last Modified: 19 Mar 2014 12:56
URI: http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/737

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