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dc.contributor.authorCaperon, Lizzieen
dc.contributor.authorSykes-Muskett, Biancaen
dc.contributor.authorClancy, Fayeen
dc.contributor.authorNewell, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorKing, Rebeccaen
dc.contributor.authorPrestwich, Andrewen
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T10:42:06Z
dc.date.available2019-10-21T10:42:06Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-07
dc.identifier.citationCaperon, L., Sykes-Muskett, B., Clancy, F., Newell, J., King, R. & Prestwich, A. (2018) How effective are interventions in improving dietary behaviour in low- and middle-income countries? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Health Psychology Review, 12(3), pp. 312-331.en
dc.identifier.issn1743-7202en
dc.identifier.issn1743-7199
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/10130
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/17437199.2018.1481763
dc.descriptionCaperon, Lizzie - ORCID 0000-0001-5204-170X https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5204-170Xen
dc.descriptionItem not available in this repository.
dc.descriptionPreviously deposited in White Rose Research Online repository on 08 Jun 2018 at: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/131796/
dc.description.abstractSeveral interventions encouraging people to change their diet have been tested in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) but these have not been meta-synthesised and it is not known which elements of these interventions contribute to their effectiveness. The current review addressed these issues. Randomised controlled trials of dietary interventions in LMICs were eligible and identified via eight publication databases. Elements of both the intervention and comparison groups (e.g., behaviour change techniques (BCTs), delivery mode), participant characteristics and risk of bias were coded. Random effects meta-analysis of 76 randomised controlled trials found, on average, small- to medium-sized but highly heterogeneous improvement in dietary behaviour following an intervention. Small and homogeneous improvements were found for BMI/weight, waist- and hip-circumference, with medium-sized, but heterogeneous, improvements in blood pressure and cholesterol. Although many BCTs have yet to be tested in this context, meta-regressions suggested some BCTs (action planning, self-monitoring of outcome(s) of behaviour; demonstration of behaviour) as well as individually randomised trials, adult- or hypertensive-samples and lack of blinding were associated with larger dietary behaviour effect sizes. Interventions to encourage people from LMICs to change their diet produce, on average, small-to-medium-sized effects. These effects may possibly be increased through the inclusion of specific BCTs and other study elements.en
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/17437199.2018.1481763en
dc.format.extent312-331en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Psychology Reviewen
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectSystematic Reviewen
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen
dc.subjectBehaviour Change Interventionsen
dc.subjectLow-income Countriesen
dc.subjectMiddle-income Countriesen
dc.titleHow effective are interventions in improving dietary behaviour in low- and middle-income countries? A systematic review and meta-analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightsnone
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-05-24
dc.description.volume12en
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2018-06-07
refterms.dateFCD2019-10-21
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorCaperon, Lizzieen
qmu.centreInstitute for Global Health and Developmenten
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number3en
refterms.versionNAen
refterms.dateDeposit2019-10-21


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