Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 Unported
dc.contributor.authorBlaisdell, Caralynen
dc.contributor.authorHarden, Jenien
dc.contributor.authorTisdall, E. Kay M.en
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-11T13:22:27Z
dc.date.available2020-02-11T13:22:27Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationBlaisdell, C., Harden, J. & Tisdall, E. K. M. (2014) Introduction to the Special Issue on involving children and young people in research. International Journal of Child, Youth, and Family Studies.en
dc.identifier.issn1920-7298en
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/10520
dc.identifier.urihttps://journals.uvic.ca/index.php/ijcyfs/article/view/13364/4227
dc.descriptionCaralyn Blaisdell - ORCID 0000-0002-5491-7346 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5491-7346en
dc.descriptionItem previously deposited in University of Strathclyde repository on 10 Mar 2017 at: https://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/id/eprint/60131
dc.description.abstractThe status of children and young people in social research has been a key area of debate since the emergence of the “new” sociology of childhood in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Sparked initially by work in sociology and anthropology, the sociology of childhood rapidly spread to become an interdisciplinary area of interest, now commonly referred to as “childhood studies”, to recognize its increasing multi-disciplinary spread (Punch & Tisdall, 2012). With the emergence of this paradigm, new ways of conceptualizing and theorizing childhood were linked to changes in how research with children and young people was conducted. Researchers considered how their own understandings of childhood, constructed by “culturally and historically specific beliefs and assumptions” (Harden, Scott, Backett-Milburn, & Jackson, 2000, 2.4), affected the way they engaged with children and young people in the research context. The concept of children’s agency was enthusiastically adopted by the nascent childhood studies community (James & Prout, 1997) and underpinned attempts to allow children and young people a “more direct voice and participation” (Prout & James, 1997, p. 8) in research about their lives. This agenda stood in contrast to historic – and cross-disciplinary – research practice, which relied on the perspectives of adult researchers, professionals, or parents (Woodgate, 2001). There were also strong links with a children’s rights perspective, a core element of which is children and young people’s “right to be heard” (United Nations [UN] Committee on the Rights of the Child, 2009).en
dc.description.urihttps://journals.uvic.ca/index.php/ijcyfs/article/view/13364/4227en
dc.format.extent605-610en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Victoriaen
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Child, Youth, and Family Studiesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.titleIntroduction to the Special Issue on involving children and young people in researchen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.volume5en
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2014
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorBlaisdell, Caralynen
qmu.centreCentre for Applied Social Sciencesen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number4.1en
refterms.versionVoRen
refterms.dateDeposit2020-01-11
refterms.dateDeposit2020-01-11


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 Unported
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 Unported