Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
dc.contributor.authorRiga, Lilianaen
dc.contributor.authorLanger, Johannesen
dc.contributor.authorDakessian, Areken
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-14T08:15:36Z
dc.date.available2020-05-14T08:15:36Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-05
dc.identifier.citationRiga, L., Langer, J. & Dakessian, A. (2020) Theorizing refugeedom: Becoming young political subjects in Beirut. Theory and Society (In Press).en
dc.identifier.issn1573-7853en
dc.identifier.issn0304-2421
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/10597
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11186-020-09393-2
dc.descriptionArek Dakessian - ORCID 0000-0001-7792-6862 https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7792-6862en
dc.description.abstractRefugees can be formed as “subjects” as they navigate forced displacement in countries that are not their own. In particular, everyday life as the politicized Other, and as humanitarianism’s depoliticized beneficiary, can constitute them as political subjects. Understanding these produced subjects and subjectivities leads us to conceive of forced displacement – or “refugeedom” – as a human condition or experience of political (sub)alterity, within which inhere distinctive subjectivations and subjectivities. Drawing on fieldwork in Beirut, Lebanon, we use young Syrian and Iraqi refugees’ experiences with everyday racism, violent bullying and racialized discrimination as heuristic lenses with which to see displacement’s political subjects and subjectivities. We argue that the young refugees emerge as both political and moral subjects through core and defining struggles within – and against – these politicizing constraints. We interpret their struggles as ambivalently and dynamically situated within humanitarianism’s and racism’s subjections and subjectivities. Yet we also found that occasionally the young refugees could eclipse these produced subjectivities to claim repoliticized subjecthoods distinct from those of humanitarianism and outside displacement’s normal politics. We interpret these in Rancièrian terms as “political subjectivation.” Abstracting our findings, we offer a simple theoretical architecture of refugeedom’s subjectivations, subjects, and subjectivities as comprising humanitarianism’s rights-bearing or juridical subject; the vulnerable and resilient, innocent and suffering subject; and the Othered or racialized subject, formed through the exclusions of displacement’s politicized spaces. But we also conceive refugeedom as a space of values, and so the ground on which moral meaning and significance attach to agency and subjectivity.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFieldwork was funded by The British Academy (Academic Grant Number SG152525).en
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11186-020-09393-2en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.ispartofTheory and Societyen
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectForced Displacementen
dc.subjectJacques Rancièreen
dc.subjectPolitical And Moral Agencyen
dc.subjectRacism And Racializationen
dc.subjectRefugeesen
dc.subjectSubjectivation And Subjectivityen
dc.titleTheorizing refugeedom: Becoming young political subjects in Beiruten
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dcterms.dateAccepted2020-04-18
dc.description.ispublishedinpress
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2020-05-05
refterms.dateFCD2020-05-14
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorDakessian, Areken
qmu.centreInstitute for Global Health and Developmenten
dc.description.statusinpress
refterms.versionVoRen
refterms.dateDeposit2020-05-14


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License