Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHaire, Nickyen
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, Raymonden
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-09T13:41:28Z
dc.date.available2020-07-09T13:41:28Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-14
dc.identifier.citationHaire, N. & MacDonald, R. (2019) Humour in music therapy: A narrative literature review. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy, 28(4), pp. 273-290.en
dc.identifier.issn0809-8131en
dc.identifier.issn1944-8260
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/08098131.2019.1577288
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/10640
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Humour is a highly prevalent but little understood phenomenon. In music therapy, experiences of humour are not well documented yet anecdotally widespread. Method: A narrative literature review was conducted to identify, critically analyse and synthesise literature related to humour in music therapy. Literature was limited to accessible publications in the English language and sourced from multiple music therapy journals, bibliographic databases, electronic databases and books from the earliest available date until June 2018 using the key terms of humour/humor. Results: Two empirical research studies that focussed on humour in music therapy were identified and references to humour were found in over 130 articles. Humour in music therapy was evidently taken for granted as a phenomenon with relationship-building effects. In addition, references to humour came overwhelmingly from music therapists’ point of view. Despite one comprehensive research study exploring humour in music therapy, a lack of investigation into reciprocal experiences of humour and how this is “played out” through improvisation was identified. Discussion: This review surfaces a phenomenon that is ubiquitous yet under-researched in music therapy. In general, a kind of insider knowledge appears necessary for humour to be shared; yet the ambiguity inherent in humour means that music therapists can encounter risk in using or engaging with it in their work. These findings have led directly to further research into reciprocal embodied experiences of humour and improvisation in music therapy.en
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1080/08098131.2019.1577288en
dc.format.extent273-290en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGAMUTen
dc.relation.ispartofNordic Journal of Music Therapyen
dc.subjectHumouren
dc.subjectImprovisationen
dc.subjectMusic Therapyen
dc.subjectIncongruityen
dc.subjectIntersubjectivityen
dc.subjectRelationshipen
dc.titleHumour in music therapy: A narrative literature reviewen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dcterms.dateAccepted2019-01-20
dc.description.volume28en
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2019-02-14
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorHaire, Nickyen
qmu.centreCentre for Person-centred Practise Researchen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number4en
refterms.versionVoRen
refterms.dateDeposit2020-07-09


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record