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dc.contributor.authorCheng, Carolineen
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-28T08:34:55Z
dc.date.available2020-07-28T08:34:55Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/10649
dc.description.abstractThe impact of social connections on refugees’ wellbeing has been well established in previous refugee studies. However, the impact on Chinese asylum seekers’ and refugees’ (ASRs) wellbeing has rarely been studied. This study aimed to understand what living a good life means to Chinese ASRs in Glasgow and how social connections help to achieve wellbeing for individuals and families. The study employed interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to guide inquiry, a methodology that examines lived experience in detail. Data collection was conducted in Glasgow in three phases utilizing individual interviews, family interviews, and a participatory exercise. Thematic analysis and IPA were adopted for data analysis. First, the study explored the wellbeing constructs of 25 ASRs through interviews; second, participatory research was employed to understand participants’ social connection patterns in three groups with a total of 15 participants. Finally, an in-depth study was conducted to determine how the five families define and understand wellbeing, with an investigation of their perceived pathways to achieve those goals. The findings show children’s education, social connections with friends and family, competency in the English language and staying healthy are key facilitators for attaining wellbeing. The study also revealed that Chinese ASRs have limited knowledge and awareness of social services, and a lack of opportunity to interact and give help in host community. In general, the ASRs live in isolation, with limited support or channels to achieve all the elements of a good life they have envisaged. The data from the family interviews suggest that each family’s division of labour, and bonding relationships with their own ethnic group and Chinese ethnic agencies, which act as bridges, are key pathways to living a good life. This study presents evidence on the importance of social connection to ASRs’ wellbeing. Findings of the research suggest that policy makers and service providers should design more programmes and services to facilitate interaction among Chinese ARSs, their host community and social service providers to more effectively assist refugees in the resettlement process. Key words: Refugees, asylum seekers, migrants, social connections, wellbeing, resettlementen
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University, Edinburgh
dc.titleSocial connections and wellbeing amongst Chinese asylum seeking and refugee families in Glasgow: A qualitative studyen
dc.typeThesis
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD Doctor of Philosophy


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