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dc.contributor.authorStrohmeier, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorPanter-Brick, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-26T10:12:46Z
dc.date.available2020-08-26T10:12:46Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifierhttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/20.500.12289/10673/10673.pdf
dc.identifier.citationStrohmeier, H. & Panter-Brick, C. (2020) Living with transience in high‐risk humanitarian spaces: Gendered experiences of international staff and policy implications for building resilience. Disasters (In Press).
dc.identifier.issn1467-7717
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/10673
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/disa.12460
dc.descriptionFrom PubMed via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionPublication status: aheadofprint
dc.description.abstractBeing deployed in crisis zones is perilous business. To-date, little is known regarding how humanitarian workers relate social and professional goals to lived experiences of high-risk environments. In South Sudan, ranked as the most dangerous country for aid workers globally, we interviewed international humanitarian staff (n=20) to examine, using thematic and interpretative phenomenological analysis, their sense of place, wellbeing, and vocation. Subjectivities of humanitarian spaces hinged upon negotiating physical hardships and social relationships: Juba was described both as a "prison" and "party hot spot." For expatriate staff, making sense of spatial, social, and professional transience was sharply gendered and rooted in subjectivities of risk-taking, crisis-managing, and career-building. We highlight two policy measures to address the implications of transience for human wellbeing and organizational effectiveness. Efforts to support teams and structure work environments, altering the humanitarian and vocational bubble, will help build resilience at the heart of humanitarian systems.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.ispartofDisasters
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Strohmeier, H. & Panter-Brick, C. (2020) Living with transience in high‐risk humanitarian spaces: Gendered experiences of international staff and policy implications for building resilience. Disasters (In Press), which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/disa.12460. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
dc.subjectHumanitarian
dc.subjectCareer
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectInterpretative Phenomenological Analysis
dc.subjectLived Experiences
dc.subjectResilience
dc.subjectRisk Management
dc.subjectStaff Retention
dc.subjectTransience
dc.titleLiving with transience in high-risk humanitarian spaces: Gendered experiences of international staff and policy implications for building resilience
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.date.updated2020-08-25T00:47:30Z
dc.description.ispublishedinpress
refterms.dateFCD2020-08-26
qmu.authorStrohmeier, Hannah
dc.description.statusinpress
refterms.dateDeposit2020-08-26


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