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dc.contributor.authorJones, Sianen
dc.contributor.authorJames, Lucyen
dc.contributor.authorFox, Claireen
dc.contributor.authorBlunn, Lydiaen
dc.contributor.editorAltmann, Tobiasen
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-10T10:59:37Z
dc.date.available2021-02-10T10:59:37Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifierhttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/20.500.12289/11103/11103.pdf
dc.identifier.citationJones, S., James, L., Fox, C. & Blunn, L. (2021) Laughing together: The relationships between humor and friendship in childhood through to adulthood. In: Altmann, T. (ed.) Friendship in Cultural and Personality Psychology: International Perspectives. New York: Nova (In Press).en
dc.identifier.urihttps://novapublishers.com/
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/11103
dc.descriptionSian Jones - ORCID 0000-0002-2399-1017 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2399-1017en
dc.description.abstractThe ‘humor styles’ approach assumes that humor can be adaptive and maladaptive, with four main styles reflecting how we use humor in every-day life: Affiliative, Self-enhancing, Self defeating, and Aggressive. In this chapter we present findings from several studies, with children, adolescents, and adults, all exploring the associations between the four humor styles and different aspects of friendship. It is argued that the different styles of humor have an important influence on our social relationships. For example, affiliative humor may be used by children to maintain their friendships. It is enjoyed and valued by others and so its use can add to children’s ongoing popularity and acceptance. Furthermore, humor increases in comfortable social settings, providing peer accepted children with further opportunities to become skilled in their use of adaptive humor. We examine associations between humor and different facets of friendships, such as number of friends, friendship quality, and skills in initiating relationships, and provide evidence of a reciprocal relationship between humor and friendship. We further examine research on cultural influences on the links between humor styles and friendship relations.en
dc.description.urihttps://novapublishers.com/en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNovaen
dc.relation.ispartofFriendship in Cultural and Personality Psychology: International Perspectivesen
dc.titleLaughing together: The relationships between humor and friendship in childhood through to adulthooden
dc.typeBook chapteren
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-02-10
dc.description.ispublishedinpress
rioxxterms.typeBook chapteren
rioxxterms.publicationdate2021
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2022
refterms.dateFCD2021-02-10
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorJones, Sianen
qmu.centreCentre for Applied Social Sciencesen
dc.description.statusinpress
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2021-02-10
refterms.dateFreeToRead2022
refterms.dateFreeToDownload2022
refterms.dateToSearch2022


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