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dc.rights.licenseCC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license
dc.contributor.authorMapson, Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorMajor, George
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-22T10:53:44Z
dc.date.available2021-02-22T10:53:44Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-18
dc.identifierhttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/20.500.12289/11109/11109.pdf
dc.identifier.citationMapson, R. & Major, G. (2021) Interpreters, rapport, and the role of familiarity. Journal of Pragmatics, 176, pp. 63-75.en
dc.identifier.issn0378-2166en
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2021.01.020
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/11109
dc.descriptionRachel Mapson - ORCID: 0000-0003-0400-6576 https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0400-6576en
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores one of the conditions that can foster interpreters’ ability to process meaning: their familiarity with the primary participants. Discussion focuses on how latent networks (Watts, 2003) inform the interpretation of relational work (Locher and Watts, 2005) and rapport management (Spencer-Oatey, 2000/2008). The relationship between familiarity and interpretation of relational activity is illustrated through the juxtaposition of two independent studies. Data in the first study were generated through semi-structured group discussions involving eight experienced British Sign Language/English interpreters to identify contextual influences on their choice of interpreting strategies around im/politeness. The findings from the first study are complemented by an interactional sociolinguistic analysis of relational practice within healthcare. In this second study, observational recordings of two naturally occurring general practice consultations, interpreted between Australian Sign Language and English, were supplemented with reflective interviews with the participants. Familiarity emerged as a strong theme across both studies. Familiarity provides the background knowledge enabling interpreters to better understand both the content and the intent of participants’ language. The knowledge afforded by familiarity reduces interpreters’ cognitive load and may therefore facilitate their greater focus on the relational aspects of the interaction.en
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.pragma.2021.01.020en
dc.format.extent63-75en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pragmaticsen
dc.rights© 2021. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectInterpretingen
dc.subjectRapporten
dc.subjectIm/politenessen
dc.subjectFamiliarityen
dc.subjectBritish Sign Language (BSL)en
dc.subjectAustralian Sign Language (Auslan)en
dc.titleInterpreters, rapport, and the role of familiarityen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-01-19
dc.description.volume176en
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2021-02-18
refterms.dateEmbargoEnd2022-02-18
refterms.dateFCD2021-02-22
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorMapson, Rachelen
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statuspub
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2021-02-22
refterms.dateFreeToRead2022-02-18
refterms.dateFreeToDownload2022-02-18
refterms.dateToSearch2022-02-18


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