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dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Anna
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsdottir, Erna
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-20T14:59:15Z
dc.date.available2021-07-20T14:59:15Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-02
dc.date.submitted2021-05-06
dc.identifierhttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/20.500.12289/11369/11369.pdf
dc.identifier.citationLloyd, A. & Haraldsdottir, E. (2021) Virtual reality in hospice: Improved patient well-being, BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care, 11(3), pp. 344-350.
dc.identifier.issn2045-4368
dc.identifier.issn2045-435X
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/11369
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2021-003173
dc.descriptionFrom PubMed via Jisc Publications Router
dc.descriptionAnna Lloyd - ORCID: 0000-0002-7859-1248 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7859-1248
dc.descriptionErna Haraldsdottir - ORCID: 0000-0003-4891-0743 https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4891-0743
dc.description.abstractVirtual reality (VR) technology as a therapeutic intervention has been gaining attention in healthcare settings in recent years. Studies suggest that using the technology can help alleviate symptoms such as pain and anxiety and induce positive emotions for people in hospital. Managing symptoms and promoting emotional and psychological well-being are core palliative care goals of relieving suffering of people with life-limiting illness. Accordingly, VR may be highly beneficial for use in hospice care yet remains underdeveloped in such settings. This qualitative study aimed to trial the technology and consider what benefits may emerge for hospice in patients. A one-off VR session was offered to patients at a hospice in Scotland. Sessions were observed by a researcher and followed by qualitative semi-structured interviews to discuss the experience with those who took part. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. Nineteen hospice patients successfully tried an immersive VR experience. VR sessions were acceptable for people within the hospice environment. The majority of participants enjoyed the experience. Many expressed joy and delight at the process. VR holds possibilities for relieving symptoms such as pain and anxiety frequently experienced by people in hospices. Furthermore, the technology offers the capacity to reconnect with a previous sense of self and to allow respite through the capacity to transcend current reality and connect with another meaningful reality. This exploratory study offers a starting point for larger studies to investigate the utility of VR for hospice patients.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was carried out by St Columba’s Hospice Care and was supported by Queen Margaret University. St Columba’s Hospice Care funded the social enterprise firm, Viarama, to carry out the virtual reality sessions but had no further financial arrangement or involvement or incentive with Viarama. No additional funding was sourced, therefore the authors had no financial relationship with the funders.
dc.languageen
dc.publisherBMJ
dc.relation.ispartofBMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
dc.rightsThis article has been accepted for publication in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2021-003173 © Authors (or their employer(s))
dc.sourceeissn: 2045-4368
dc.subjectHospice Care
dc.subjectPsychological Care
dc.subjectQuality Of Life
dc.subjectSpiritual Care
dc.subjectSupportive Care
dc.subjectTerminal Care
dc.titleVirtual reality in hospice: Improved patient well-being
dc.typeArticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dcterms.dateAccepted2021-06-14
dc.date.updated2021-07-17T01:26:30Z
dc.description.ispublishedpub
refterms.dateFCD2021-08-23
qmu.authorLloyd, Anna
qmu.authorHaraldsdottir, Erna
qmu.centreCentre for Person-centred Practise Research
dc.description.statuspub
refterms.versionAM
refterms.dateDeposit2021-08-23


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