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dc.contributor.authorWelling, L.
dc.contributor.authorJones, B.
dc.contributor.authorDebruine, L.
dc.contributor.authorConway, C. A.
dc.contributor.authorLawsmith, M.
dc.contributor.authorLittle, A.
dc.contributor.authorFeinberg, D.
dc.contributor.authorSharp, M. A.
dc.contributor.authorAl-Dujaili, Emad A. S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:33:08Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:33:08Z
dc.date.issued2007-08
dc.identifierER1147
dc.identifier.citationWelling, L., Jones, B., Debruine, L., Conway, C., Lawsmith, M., Little, A., Feinberg, D., Sharp, M. & Al-Dujaili, E. (2007) Raised salivary testosterone in women is associated with increased attraction to masculine faces, Hormones and Behavior, vol. 52, , pp. 156-161,
dc.identifier.issn0018506X
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.yhbeh.2007.01.010
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/1147
dc.description.abstractWomen's preferences for masculinity in men's faces, voices and behavioral displays change during the menstrual cycle and are strongest around ovulation. While previous findings suggest that change in progesterone level is an important hormonal mechanism for such variation, it is likely that changes in the levels of other hormones will also contribute to cyclic variation in masculinity preferences. Here we compared women's preferences for masculine faces at two points in the menstrual cycle where women differed in salivary testosterone, but not in salivary progesterone or estrogen. Preferences for masculinity were strongest when women's testosterone levels were relatively high. Our findings complement those from previous studies that show systematic variation in masculinity preferences during the menstrual cycle and suggest that change in testosterone level may play an important role in cyclic shifts in women's preferences for masculine traits.
dc.format.extent156-161
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofHormones and Behavior
dc.subjectFace perception
dc.subjectAttractiveness
dc.subjectSexual dimorphism
dc.subjectTestosterone
dc.subjectMenstrual cycle
dc.subjectAndrogen
dc.titleRaised salivary testosterone in women is associated with increased attraction to masculine faces
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_die
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dc.description.volume52
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.1016/j.yhbeh.2007.01.010
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid1147
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorAl-Dujaili, Emad A. S.
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number2


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