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dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Rachaelen
dc.contributor.authorCrompton, Catherine J.en
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-28T13:13:10Z
dc.date.available2021-09-28T13:13:10Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-09
dc.identifierhttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/20.500.12289/11504/11504.pdf
dc.identifier.citationDavis, R. and Crompton, C.J. (2021) 'What do new findings about social interaction in autistic adults mean for neurodevelopmental research?', Perspectives on Psychological Science, 16(3), pp. 649-653.en
dc.identifier.issn1745-6916en
dc.identifier.issn1745-6924
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1745691620958010
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/11504
dc.descriptionRachael Davis – ORCID: 0000-0002-3887-6003 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3887-6003en
dc.description.abstractDeficit-based accounts of social and communication abilities continue to dominate autism research. However, emerging findings suggest that this view may be overly simplistic and discount the two-way nature of interaction. Here we discuss the reconceptualization of social cognition to consider such difficulties as examples of bidirectional, multifaceted misattunement between autistic and nonautistic individuals. Aligned with progressive theoretical frameworks, emerging empirical research indicates that mismatches in communication styles can contribute to autistic social difficulties and the important role that nonautistic difficulties play. We highlight two areas of future research with the aim of providing empirical support for the views that the autistic community has proposed over the past 2 decades. We discuss the impact of such a paradigm shift on a number of levels, including how bridging the gap between different interaction styles can reduce stigma and increase understanding. Adopting such a framework will provide radical opportunities for transformative societal changes and education around inclusion.en
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/1745691620958010en
dc.format.extent649-653en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAssociation for Psychological Scienceen
dc.relation.ispartofPerspectives on Psychological Scienceen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectAutismen
dc.subjectDevelopmenten
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectInteractionen
dc.subjectNeurodiversityen
dc.titleWhat do new findings about social interaction in autistic adults mean for neurodevelopmental research?en
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.volume16en
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2021-02-09
refterms.dateFCD2021-09-28
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorDavis, Rachaelen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number3en
refterms.versionVoRen
refterms.dateDeposit2021-09-28


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License