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dc.contributor.authorWitter, Sophieen
dc.contributor.authorSheikh, Kabiren
dc.contributor.authorSchleiff, Meikeen
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-23T16:17:59Z
dc.date.available2022-02-23T16:17:59Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationWitter, S., Sheikh, K. and Schleiff, M. (2022) 'Learning health systems in low and middle income countries: Exploring evidence and expert insights', to be published in BMJ Global Health.en
dc.identifier.issn2059-7908en
dc.identifier.urihttps://gh.bmj.com/
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/11910
dc.descriptionSophie Witter - ORCID: 0000-0002-7656-6188 https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7656-6188en
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Learning Health Systems (LHS) is a multifaceted subject. This paper reviewed current concepts as well as real-world experiences of learning health systems, drawing on published and unpublished knowledge in order to identify and describe important principles and practices that characterize learning health systems in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings.en
dc.description.abstractMethods We adopted an exploratory approach to the literature review, recognizing there are limited studies that focus specifically on system-wide learning in LMICs, but a vast set of connected bodies of literature. 116 studies were included, drawn from an electronic literature search of published and grey literature. In addition, 17 interviews were conducted with health policy and research experts to gain experiential knowledge.
dc.description.abstractResults The findings were structured by eight domains on learning enablers. All of these interact with one another and influence actors from community to international levels. We found that learning comes from the connection between information, deliberation, and action. Moreover, these processes occur at different levels. It is therefore important to consider experiential knowledge from multiple levels and experiences. Creating spaces and providing resources for communities, staff and managers to deliberate on their challenges and find solutions has political implications, however, and is challenging, particularly when resources are constrained, funding and accountability are fragmented and the focus is short-term and narrow. Nevertheless, we can learn from countries that have managed to develop institutional mechanisms and human capacities which help health systems respond to changing environments with ‘best fit’ solutions.
dc.description.abstractConclusion Health systems are knowledge producers, but learning is not automatic. It needs to be valued and facilitated. Everyday governance of health systems can create spaces for reflective practice and learning within routine processes at different levels. This article highlights important enablers, but there remains much work to be done on developing this field of knowledge.
dc.description.urihttps://gh.bmj.com/en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen
dc.relation.ispartofBMJ Global Healthen
dc.titleLearning health systems in low and middle income countries: Exploring evidence and expert insightsen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dcterms.dateAccepted2022
dc.description.ispublishedinpress
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2022
refterms.dateFCD2022-02-23
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorWitter, Sophieen
qmu.centreInstitute for Global Health and Developmenten
dc.description.statusinpress
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2022-02-23


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