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dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Jodi E.en
dc.contributor.authorClunie, Gemmaen
dc.contributor.authorMa, Joan K-Yen
dc.contributor.authorCoffey, Margareten
dc.contributor.authorWiniker, Katharinaen
dc.contributor.authorRichmond, Sallyen
dc.contributor.authorLowell, Soren Y.en
dc.contributor.authorVolkmer, Annaen
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-10T14:02:27Z
dc.date.available2022-03-10T14:02:27Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-24
dc.identifierhttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/20.500.12289/11932/11932.pdf
dc.identifier.citationAllen, J.E., Clunie, G., Ma, J. K.-Y., Coffey, M., Winiker, K., Richmond, S., Lowell, S.Y. and Volkmer, A. (2022) ‘Translating ultrasound into clinical practice for the assessment of swallowing and laryngeal function: A speech and language pathology-led consensus study’, Dysphagia (In Press).en
dc.identifier.issn1432-0460en
dc.identifier.issn0179-051X
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-022-10413-9
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/11932
dc.descriptionJoan Ma - ORCID: 0000-0003-2051-8360 https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2051-8360en
dc.description.abstractUltrasound (US) has an emerging evidence base for the assessment of swallowing and laryngeal function. Accessibility and technological advances support the use of US as a clinical assessment tool; however, there is insufficient evidence to support its translation into clinical practice. This study aimed to establish consensus on the priorities for translation of US into clinical practice for the assessment of swallowing and laryngeal function. Nominal Group Technique (NGT) was used as a formal method of consensus development. Clinicians and academics, all members of an international US working group, were invited to participate in the study. Two NGT meetings were held, where participants silently generated and then shared ideas. Participants anonymously ranked items. Rankings were aggregated before participants re-ranked items in order of priority. Discussions regarding rankings were recorded and transcribed to inform analysis. Member-checking with participants informed the final analysis. Participants (n = 15) were speech and language pathologists, physiotherapists and sonographers representing six countries. Fifteen items were identified and prioritised 1–13 (including two equally ranked items). Reliability, validity and normative data emerged as key areas for research while development of training protocols and engagement with stakeholders were considered vital to progressing US into practice. Analysis revealed common themes that might be addressed together in research, in addition to the ranked priority. A measured approach to the translation of US into clinical practice will enable effective implementation of this tool. Priorities may evolve as clinical and professional contexts shift, but this study provides a framework to advance research and clinical practice in this field.en
dc.description.sponsorshipJodi Allen receives part-funding from the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Pre-Clinical Academic Fellowship Award. Gemma Clunie receives funding from the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Integrated Clinical Academic Clinical Doctoral Fellowship Programme and acknowledges the support and infrastructure provided by the NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre. Anna Volkmer receives funding from the NIHR via a Development and Skills Award. Soren Lowell receives funding from the National Institute of Health (NIH) Research Enhancement Award (R15).en
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00455-022-10413-9en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.ispartofDysphagiaen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectUltrasounden
dc.subjectAssessmenten
dc.subjectDysphagiaen
dc.subjectSwallowingen
dc.subjectLaryngeal Functionen
dc.titleTranslating ultrasound into clinical practice for the assessment of swallowing and laryngeal function: A speech and language pathology-led consensus studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-01-19
dc.description.ispublishedaheadofprint
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2022-02-24
refterms.dateFCD2022-03-10
refterms.depositExceptionpublishedGoldOAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorMa, Joan K-Yen
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statusaheadofprint
refterms.versionVoRen
refterms.dateDeposit2022-03-10


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License