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dc.contributor.authorHill, Gordonen
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Mairghread JHen
dc.contributor.authorIrvine, Lindesayen
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-05T12:52:54Z
dc.date.available2022-04-05T12:52:54Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-01
dc.identifierhttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/20.500.12289/11979/11979.pdf
dc.identifier.citationHill, G., Ellis, M. and Irvine, L. (2022) ‘Duality of practice in clinical research nursing’, Journal of Research in Nursing, 27(1-2), pp. 116-127.en
dc.identifier.issn1744-9871en
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/17449871211070976
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/11979
dc.descriptionMairghread Ellis - ORCID: 0000-0002-3474-533X https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3474-533Xen
dc.description.abstractBackground: International evidence suggests that Clinical Research Nurses (CRN) can have a dual role incorporating both clinical care and research responsibilities. This duality of role often assists in meeting the clinical care and research needs of the participants and can contribute to the credibility of the CRN role. Conversely, it can also lead to feelings of confusion and role conflict as CRN’s time is divided. Aim: To identify and explore experiences of clinical and research roles among CRNs. This emerged as a theme in a wider research project exploring CRNs’ experiences of working with clinical nurses. Methods: Following an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis approach, 10 CRNs participated in face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Transcribed data were analysed and a number of themes emerged. Duality of role was one of these. Findings: Findings indicated that if CRNs fulfil a dual role, this can assist in care provision, research delivery and in building positive relationships with clinical nurses. However, there were also instances when a dual role led to clinical nurses questioning the value of research and to issues with competing demands of clinical care and research. These experiences had an important impact on some of the CRNs and led to reflection on the value of their role. Conclusions: This study identifies new understandings of a dual role of the CRN. The findings will inform the preparation and practice of this group of nurses, whilst also leading to a deeper understanding of the CRN’s role in care and research delivery. It will also contribute to a wider appreciation of organisational factors and social interactions that impact on health care research.en
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/17449871211070976en
dc.format.extent116-127en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Research in Nursingen
dc.rightsUnder SAGE's Green Open Access policy, the Accepted Version of the article may be posted in the author's institutional repository and reuse is restricted to non-commercial and no derivative uses.
dc.subjectClinical Research Nurseen
dc.subjectClinical Research Nursingen
dc.subjectDualen
dc.subjectDualityen
dc.subjectProfessional Relationshipsen
dc.subjectRoleen
dc.titleDuality of practice in clinical research nursingen
dc.typeArticleen
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dcterms.dateAccepted2022-01-27
dc.description.volume27en
dc.description.ispublishedpub
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.publicationdate2022-04-01
refterms.dateFCA2022-04-05
refterms.dateFCD2022-04-05
refterms.depositExceptionNAen
refterms.accessExceptionNAen
refterms.technicalExceptionNAen
refterms.panelUnspecifieden
qmu.authorEllis, Mairghread JHen
qmu.authorIrvine, Lindesayen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number1-2en
refterms.versionAMen
refterms.dateDeposit2022-04-05


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