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dc.contributor.authorBulley, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorShiels, J.
dc.contributor.authorWilkie, K.
dc.contributor.authorSalisbury, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:45:52Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:45:52Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifierER1606
dc.identifier.citationBulley, C., Shiels, J., Wilkie, K. & Salisbury, L. (2010) Carer experiences of life after stroke - a qualitative analysis., Disability and rehabilitation, vol. 32, , pp. 1406-13,
dc.identifier.issn0963-8288
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.3109/09638280903531238
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/1606
dc.description.abstractAims and objectives. Carers' experiences of caring for a stroke survivor were explored, including reactions and changes in their lives. Method. A phenomenological approach was taken to the collection and analysis of data. Semi-structured interviews lasting an average of 43 min were carried out with nine informal carers in their own homes. All were married to someone who had survived a stroke. Results. An overarching theme emerged, entitled: 'lives turned upside-down'. It took time for participants to understand the long-term impacts of stroke. Carers experienced increased caring and domestic workloads alongside reduced participation and altered expectations of life. They found emotional and cognitive changes in their partners particularly distressing, and would have valued more information and help with adjusting to the increased emotional, physical and cognitive workload of caring. Conclusions. It is important to support carers of people who have survived a stroke in adjusting to their changed lifestyles. This may affect their quality of life as well as sustainability of caring, and requires further research.
dc.description.abstractFor the United Kingdom, and some other developed countries, active international recruitment has become a solution to shortages of health professionals. issue of migration of health professionals has become an important feature of international health policy debate symbolised by the passing of a resolution at the World Health Assembly
dc.format.extent1406-13
dc.relation.ispartofDisability and rehabilitation
dc.titleCarer experiences of life after stroke - a qualitative analysis.
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_phy
dc.description.volume32
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.3109/09638280903531238
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid1606
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorSalisbury, Lisa
qmu.authorBulley, Catherine
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number17


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