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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Stuart
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:29:58Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:29:58Z
dc.date.issued2010-06-12
dc.identifierER1755
dc.identifier.citationWilson, S. (2010) The Naturalness of Weird Beliefs., The Psychologist, vol. 23, , pp. 564-567,
dc.identifier.issn0952-8229
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.thepsychologist.org.uk/archive/archive_home.cfm?volumeID=23&editionID=190&ArticleID=1695
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.thepsychologist.org.uk/archive/archive_home.cfm?volumeID=23&editionID=190&ArticleID=1695
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/1755
dc.description.abstractEveryone knows that religious ideas are pervasive and robust, but what is it about our minds that make them so attractive? Even when traditional religious concepts have been rejected, many people are still drawn to the notion that there may be 'meaning' and 'purpose' to existence and find it odd if others don't share these beliefs. Are we hardwired to believe in weird things? Recent theoretical and empirical work has started to inform us that such beliefs may be a natural feature of our evolved minds, making belief the default and scepticism a cognitive effort.
dc.format.extent564-567
dc.publisherBritish Psychological Society
dc.relation.ispartofThe Psychologist
dc.titleThe Naturalness of Weird Beliefs.
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultydiv_PaS
dc.description.volume23
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid1755
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorWilson, Stuart
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number7


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