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dc.contributor.authorDonaghy, Marie
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, A. H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:33:11Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:33:11Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifierER1836
dc.identifier.citationDonaghy, M. & Taylor, A. (2010) Should practitioners promote physical activity as a treatment for depression?, Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, vol. 30, , pp. 132-135,
dc.identifier.issn14782715
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.4997/JRCPE.2010.223
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/1836
dc.description.abstractFor many years, experts have been debating the pros and cons of exercise for depression. Proponents of exercise for depression point to those clinical trials which have shown that exercise improves mood, while sceptics point out the methodological problems in many of the apparently positive trials, and the uncertainties around the acceptability of exercise as a treatment for depression. Here two experts critically review the evidence around exercise for depression, provide arguments for and against the promotion of physical activity as a treatment for depression, explore issues around the generalisability of exercise as a treatment for depression and look to the future by discussing ongoing trials that will provide more evidence to inform this important debate. 2010 Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh.
dc.format.extent132-135
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
dc.titleShould practitioners promote physical activity as a treatment for depression?
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_die
dc.description.volume30
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid1836
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorDonaghy, Marie
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number2


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