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dc.contributor.authorMayo, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorScobbie, James M.
dc.contributor.authorHewlett, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Daphne
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:51:15Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:51:15Z
dc.date.issued2003-10
dc.identifierER2209
dc.identifier.citationMayo, C., Scobbie, J., Hewlett, N. & Waters, D. (2003-10) The Influence of Phonemic Awareness Development on Acoustic Cue Weighting Strategies in Children's Speech Perception, Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, vol. 46, pp. 1184-1196.
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/2209
dc.description.abstractIn speech perception, children give particular patterns of weight to different acoustic cues (their cue weighting). These patterns appear to change with increased linguistic experience. Previous speech perception research has found a positive correlation between more analytical cue weighting strategies and the ability to consciously think about and manipulate segment-sized units (phonemic awareness). That research did not, however, aim to address whether the relation is in any way causal or, if so, then in which direction possible causality might move. Causality in this relation could move in 1 of 2 ways: Either phonemic awareness development could impact on cue weighting strategies or changes in cue weighting could allow for the later development of phonemic awareness. The aim of this study was to follow the development of these 2 processes longitudinally to determine which of the above 2 possibilities was more likely. Five-year-old children were tested 3 times in 7 months on their cue weighting strategies for a /so/-/So/ contrast, in which the 2 cues manipulated were the frequency of fricative spectrum and the frequency of vowel-onset formant transitions. The children were also tested at the same time on their phoneme segmentation and phoneme blending skills. Results showed that phonemic awareness skills tended to improve before cue weighting changed and that early phonemic awareness ability predicted later cue weighting strategies. These results suggest that the development of metaphonemic awareness may play some role in changes in cue weighting.
dc.format.extent1184-1196
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
dc.subjectSpeech Perception
dc.subjectDevelopment
dc.subjectCue Weighting
dc.subjectPhonemic Awareness
dc.titleThe Influence of Phonemic Awareness Development on Acoustic Cue Weighting Strategies in Children's Speech Perception
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultycasl
dc.description.referencetextCohen, J., & Cohen, P. (1983). Applied multiple regression/ correlation analysis for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Dorman, M. F., Studdert-Kennedy, M., & Raphael, L. J. (1977). Stop-consonant recognition: Release bursts and formant transitions as functionally equivalent, contextdependent cues. Perception & Psychophysics, 22, 109-122. Entropic Research Lab Inc. (n.d.). Entropic ESPS/ Waves+ [Computer software]. Cambridge, UK: Author. Ferguson, C. A., & Farwell, C. B. (1975). Words and sounds in early language acquisition. Language, 51, 419-439. Fitch, H. L., Halwes, T., Erickson, D. M., & Liberman, A. L. (1980). Perceptual equivalence of two acoustic cues for stop-consonant manner. Perception & Psychophysics, 27, 343-350. Greenlee, M. (1980). Learning the phonetic cues to the voiced voiceless distinction: A comparison of child and adult speech perception. Journal of Child Language, 7, 459-468. Hazan, V., & Rosen, S. (1991). Individual variability in the perception of cues to place contrasts in initial stops. Perception & Psychophysics, 49, 187-200. Jusczyk, P. W., & Derrah, C. (1987). Representation of speech sounds by young infants. Developmental Psychology, 23, 648-654. Klatt, D. (1980). Software for a cascade/parallel formant synthesizer. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 67, 971-995. Krause, S. E. (1982). Vowel duration as a perceptual cue to postvocalic consonant voicing in young children and adults. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 71, 990-995. Lacerda, F. (1992). Young infants' discrimination of confusable speech signals. In M. E. H. Schouten (Ed.), The auditory processing of speech: From sounds to words (pp. 229-238). The Hague, The Netherlands: Mouton de Gruyter. Liberman, A. M., Delattre, P. C., & Cooper, F. S. (1952). The role of selected stimulus-variables in the perception of the unvoiced stop consonants. American Journal of Psychology, 65, 497-516. Liberman, A. M., Delattre, P. C., & Cooper, F. S. (1958). Some cues for the distinction between voiced and voiceless stops in initial position. Language and Speech, 1, 153-166. Liberman, A. M., Delattre, P. C., Cooper, F. S., & Gerstman, L. J. (1954). The role of consonant-vowel transitions in the perception of the stop and nasal consonants. Psychological Monographs: General and Applied, 68, 1-13. MacWhinney, B. (1995). The CHILDES project: Tools for analyzing talk (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Mayo, C. (2000). The relationship between phonemic awareness and cue weighting in speech perception: Longitudinal and cross-sectional child studies. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. McBride-Chang, C. (1995a). Phonological processing, speech perception, and reading disability: An integrative review. Educational Psychologist, 30, 109-121. McBride-Chang, C. (1995b). What is phonological awareness? Journal of Educational Psychology, 87, 179-192. McBride-Chang, C. (1996). Models of speech perception and phonological processing in reading, Child Development, 67, 1836-1856. McBride-Chang, C., Chang, L., & Wagner, R. (1997). Growth modeling of phonological awareness. Journal of Educational Psychology, 89, 621-630. Menn, L. (1971). Phonotactic rules in beginning speech. Lingua, 26, 225-251. Menn, L. (1983). Development of articulatory, phonetic and phonological capabilities. In B. Butterworth (Ed.),Cohen, J., & Cohen, P. (1983). Applied multiple regression/ correlation analysis for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Dorman, M. F., Studdert-Kennedy, M., & Raphael, L. J. (1977). Stop-consonant recognition: Release bursts and formant transitions as functionally equivalent, contextdependent cues. Perception & Psychophysics, 22, 109-122. Entropic Research Lab Inc. (n.d.). Entropic ESPS/ Waves+ [Computer software]. Cambridge, UK: Author. Ferguson, C. A., & Farwell, C. B. (1975). Words and sounds in early language acquisition. Language, 51, 419-439. Fitch, H. L., Halwes, T., Erickson, D. M., & Liberman, A. L. (1980). Perceptual equivalence of two acoustic cues for stop-consonant manner. Perception & Psychophysics, 27, 343-350. Greenlee, M. (1980). Learning the phonetic cues to the voiced voiceless distinction: A comparison of child and adult speech perception. Journal of Child Language, 7, 459-468. Hazan, V., & Rosen, S. (1991). Individual variability in the perception of cues to place contrasts in initial stops. Perception & Psychophysics, 49, 187-200. Jusczyk, P. W., & Derrah, C. (1987). Representation of speech sounds by young infants. Developmental Psychology, 23, 648-654. Klatt, D. (1980). Software for a cascade/parallel formant synthesizer. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 67, 971-995. Krause, S. E. (1982). Vowel duration as a perceptual cue to postvocalic consonant voicing in young children and adults. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 71, 990-995. Lacerda, F. (1992). Young infants' discrimination of confusable speech signals. In M. E. H. Schouten (Ed.), The auditory processing of speech: From sounds to words (pp. 229-238). The Hague, The Netherlands: Mouton de Gruyter. Liberman, A. M., Delattre, P. C., & Cooper, F. S. (1952). The role of selected stimulus-variables in the perception of the unvoiced stop consonants. American Journal of Psychology, 65, 497-516. Liberman, A. M., Delattre, P. C., & Cooper, F. S. (1958). Some cues for the distinction between voiced and voiceless stops in initial position. Language and Speech, 1, 153-166. Liberman, A. M., Delattre, P. C., Cooper, F. S., & Gerstman, L. J. (1954). The role of consonant-vowel transitions in the perception of the stop and nasal consonants. Psychological Monographs: General and Applied, 68, 1-13. MacWhinney, B. (1995). The CHILDES project: Tools for analyzing talk (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Mayo, C. (2000). The relationship between phonemic awareness and cue weighting in speech perception: Longitudinal and cross-sectional child studies. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh, United Kingdom. McBride-Chang, C. (1995a). Phonological processing, speech perception, and reading disability: An integrative review. Educational Psychologist, 30, 109-121. McBride-Chang, C. (1995b). What is phonological awareness? Journal of Educational Psychology, 87, 179-192. McBride-Chang, C. (1996). Models of speech perception and phonological processing in reading, Child Development, 67, 1836-1856. McBride-Chang, C., Chang, L., & Wagner, R. (1997). Growth modeling of phonological awareness. Journal of Educational Psychology, 89, 621-630. Menn, L. (1971). Phonotactic rules in beginning speech. Lingua, 26, 225-251. Menn, L. (1983). Development of articulatory, phonetic and phonological capabilities. In B. Butterworth (Ed.),
dc.description.volume46
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2003/092)
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid2209
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorHewlett, Nigel
qmu.authorScobbie, James M.
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number5


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