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dc.contributor.authorButte, Celine
dc.contributor.authorUnkovich, Geoffery
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:41:17Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:41:17Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifierER2336
dc.identifier.citationButte, C. & Unkovich, G. (2009) Foundations of Dance Movement Psychotherapy Practice in Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities: 'when disabilities disappear', e-motion, vol. XIX -, , pp. 25-33,
dc.identifier.issn1460-1281
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/2336
dc.description.abstractIntroduction This article discusses the mode of practice co-constructed by two Dance Movement Psychotherapists for co-facilitating long-term Dance Movement Psychotherapy (DMP) sessions with a closed group of adults in a Learning Disability day centre for a London Primary Care Trust. We present our Foundations of Practice with clients diagnosed with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities (PMLD) and an ethos for group-work (Shotter 1994: p39) established over time. We view this as the beginning of our journey in writing about our professional relationship with this client group, and we hope that it will stimulate others to contribute to the writing and development of practice-based-evidence for working with adults with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities. Coming from a place of curiosity regarding our practice with non-verbal clients, we have reflected on our own perceived learning and physical disabilities. This reflection has been a means for us to recognise the roots of our practice as co-working DMPs with adults with PMLD. In this paper, we bring to light and put some words on what may be one of the most non-verbal psychotherapeutic relationships. We acknowledge how our clients may be perceived in society, and the implication of having a PMLD diagnosis. We name the dichotomy between the subjectivity and authority inherent to our role as DMPs, and our intention to be curious and open to our clients' unique way of expressing themselves. Recognising these positions and locating our practice within a social constructionist framework we identify tools and techniques which inform our work. Movement improvisation offers us a means to ground our practice within current dance and psychotherapeutic theory. Considering breath as a vital and natural life giving experience inherent to all beings, we reflect on our roles as DMPs with this client group, particularly on the therapist's choices in his/her relationship with adults with PMLD. The clients considered in this paper are adults diagnosed with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities, individuals who hold multiple complex diagnoses; involving neurological, physiological and physical impairment together with mental health diagnosis.
dc.format.extent25-33
dc.publisherAssociation for Dance Movement Therapy UK
dc.relation.ispartofe-motion
dc.titleFoundations of Dance Movement Psychotherapy Practice in Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities: 'when disabilities disappear'
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysch_occ
dc.description.referencetextBest, P (2003). 'Interactional Shaping within Therapeutic Encounters: Three dimensional dialogues' in The USA Body Psychotherapy Journal, 2.1, pp.26-44 Bethesda MD U.S.A: USABP Bonefant, Y (2006). 'The embodied politics of intention, therapeutic intervention and artistic practice' in Payne, H (editorin- chief) Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy. Sept 2006 1(2): pp115-127 Oxon UK: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group Burr, V (2004). Social Constructionism London: Routledge Butt, C (2007). An Investigation into the Use of Interpersonal Touch in Dance Movement Therapy with Adults with Profound and Multiple Learning Disabilities Unpublished MA Dissertation, Roehampton University London Carnaby, S. & Cambridge, (2002). 'Getting Personal: An Exploratory Study of Intimate Care Provision for People with Profound and Multiple Intellectual Disabilities', Journal of Intellectual Disability Research No.46 (2), 120-132. Cecchin, G (1992). 'Constructing Therapeutic Possibilities' in McNamee, S. and K, Gergen, eds. (1996) Therapy as Social Construction London: Sage Publications Dobson, S., Carey, L., Conyers, I., Upadhyaya, S. and Raghavan, R (2004). 'Learning about Touch: An Exploratory Study to Identify the Learning Needs of Staff Supporting People with Complex Needs', Journal of Learning Disabilities, No.8 (2), 113-129 Halprin, D (2003). The Expressive Body in Life, Art and Therapy. Working with Movement, Metaphor and Meaning London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers Keleman, S (1975). Your Body Speaks Its Mind California: Center Press Keleman, S (1981). The Human Ground - Sexuality, Self and Survival California: Center Press Kvale, S (1996). InterViews, An Introduction to Qualitative Research Interviewing. London: Sage Publications 1 Writing 'response-ability', our intention is to invite the reader to consider the etymological root of the word 'responsibility' and be reminded that the origins of the word 'responsibility' lie in 'our ability to respond'. Meekums, B (2005). Dance Movement Therapy: A Creative Psychotherapy Approach London: Sage Publications Parker, G. & Best, P. A (2005). 'Reflecting Processes & Shifting Positions in Dance Movement Therapy', e-motion Quarterly Spring 2004 Vol XIV, no 10 U.K: ADMP UK Shaw, R (2003). The Embodied Psychotherapist: The Therapist's Body Story Hove: Brunner-Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group Sheehy, K. and Nind, M (2005). 'Emotional well-being for all: mental health and people with profound and multiple learning disabilities', British Journal of Learning Disabilities, No.33, 34-38 Sherborne, V (2001). Developmental Movement for Children London: Worth Publishing Shotter, J (1994). Conversational Realities - Constructing Life through Language London: Sage Publications Soth, M (2006). 'What Therapeutic Hope for a Subjective Mind in an Objectified Body?' in Corrigall, Payne & Wilkinson eds (2006) About A Body - Working With the Embodied Mind in Psychotherapy. London: Routledge Unkovich, G (2009). 'Thank You -I will have my body back now!' e - motion Quarterly Winter 2008 Vol. XVIII No 4 U.K: ADMP U.K Yalom, I (1985). The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy (3rd Edition) U.S.A: Basic Books Weblinks: About Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties, PMLDNetwork Definition Factsheet 2009. Internet WWW page at URL http://www.pmldnetwork.org /what_do_we_want/who_are_we_campaigning_for.htm (accessed 03.05.09) British Institute of Learning Disabilities. Internet WWW page at URL http://bild.org.uk (accessed 10.05.09) Valuing People Now, a new three year strategy for people with learning disabilities (2009) full pdf version, internet WWW page at URL http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/SocialCare/Deliveringadultsocialcare/Learningdisabilities/DH_079430 (accessed 03.05.09) World Health Organisation. Internet WWW page at URL http://who.int/en (accessed 03.05.09)
dc.description.volumeXIX -
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid2336
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorButte, Celine
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number2


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