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dc.contributor.authorDeighan, M. A.
dc.contributor.authorNevill, A. M.
dc.contributor.authorMaffulli, N.
dc.contributor.authorCheng, J. C.
dc.contributor.authorGleeson, Nigel
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:46:05Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:46:05Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifierER2377
dc.identifier.citationDeighan, M., Nevill, A., Maffulli, N., Cheng, J. & Gleeson, N. (2009) Evaluation of knee peak torque in athletic and sedentary children, Acta Orthopaedica et Traumatologica, vol. 43, , pp. 484-490,
dc.identifier.issn1017-995X
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/2377
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: We examined the influence of sex, level of activity, and pubertal status on knee extension (Ext) and flexion (Fl) peak torque (PT) in children using an allometric modeling approach. METHODS: A total of 140 students (67 males, 73 females) aged 12/13 years were enrolled from a Hong Kong junior high school, whose curricula were based on physical education (n=69) or arts (n=71). Isokinetic concentric Ext and Fl PT of the dominant leg was assessed at 1.04 rad/sec using a Cybex II+ dynamometer and body mass, stature, and pubertal stage were measured. A repeated-measures ANOVA test was performed on absolute PT data with muscle action (Ext and Fl) as a within-subject factor and between-subject factors including sex, group, and pubertal stage. To assess the effects on body size-adjusted PT, linear ANCOVA and log-linear ANCOVA techniques were used with body mass and stature taken as covariates. RESULTS: Peak torque was significantly greater in boys compared to girls, and in the physical education group compared to the arts group. When PT was adjusted for differences in body size, there was a greater difference in PT between girls in the two groups compared to boys, and there was a significant effect of pubertal stage. Allometric analysis showed that PT was influenced more by stature than body mass, and PT increased at a greater rate than body size (both p<0.01). CONCLUSION: There may be a need for a physical activity intervention in sedentary 12/13 year old girls. Peak torque appears to increase disproportionately to body size. This may result from a greater increase in leg muscle mass relative to body mass.
dc.format.extent484-490
dc.publisherEkin Medical Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofActa Orthopaedica et Traumatologica
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectanthropometry
dc.subjectbody height
dc.subjectbody weight
dc.subjectchild development
dc.subjectexercise
dc.subjectisometric contraction
dc.subjectknee
dc.subjectmuscle development
dc.subjectpuberty
dc.subjectsex factors
dc.subjecttorque.
dc.titleEvaluation of knee peak torque in athletic and sedentary children
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysch_phy
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dc.description.volume43
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.3944/AOTT.2009.484
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid2377
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorGleeson, Nigel
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number6


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