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dc.contributor.authorRussell, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorCorley, Martin
dc.contributor.authorLickley, Robin
dc.contributor.editorBastiaanse, Roelien
dc.contributor.editorHartsuiker, Robert J.
dc.contributor.editorPostma, Albert
dc.contributor.editorWijnen, Frank
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:53:00Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:53:00Z
dc.date.issued2005-02
dc.identifierER239
dc.identifier.citationRussell, M., Corley, M. & Lickley, R. (2005) Magnitude estimation of disfluency by stutterers and nonstutterers, , vol. 1, no. 323, pp. 248-260, UK
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-84169-262-3 (hardback) 978-0-203-50619-6 (electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/239
dc.descriptionUK
dc.description.abstractEveryone produces disfluencies when they speak spontaneously. However, whereas most disfluencies pass unnoticed, the repetitions, blocks and prolongations produced by stutterers can have a severely disruptive effect on communication. The causes of stuttering have proven hard to pin down - researchers differ widely in their views on the cognitive mechanisms that underlie it. The present chapter presents initial research which supports a view (Vasic and Wijnen, this volume) that places the emphasis firmly on the self-monitoring system, suggesting that stuttering may be a consequence of over-sensitivity to the types of minor speech error that we all make. Our study also allows us to ask whether the speech of people who stutter is perceived as qualitatively different from that of nonstutterers, when it is fluent and when it contains similar types of minor disfluencies. Our results suggest that for closely matched, naturally occurring segments of speech, listeners rate the speech of stutterers as more disfluent than that of nonstutterers.
dc.format.extent248-260
dc.format.extent323
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.ispartofPhonological Encoding and Monitoring in Normal and Pathological Speech
dc.titleMagnitude estimation of disfluency by stutterers and nonstutterers
dc.typebook_section
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultycasl
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Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 35, 1024-1032. Postma, A. & Kolk, H. (1993). The covert repair hypothesis: Prearticulatory repair processes in normal and stuttered disfluencies. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 36, 472-487. Raaijmakers, J.G.W., Schrijnemakers, J.M.C., & Gremmen, F. (1999). How to deal with The language-as-fixed-effect fallacy: Common misconceptions and alternative solutions. Journal of Memory and Language, 41, 416-426. Schiavetti, N., Sacco, P.R., Metz, D.E., & Sitler, R.W. (1983). Direct magnitude estimation and interval scaling of stuttering severity. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 26, 568- 573. Vasic, N. & Wijnen, F. (2003). Stuttering as a monitoring deficit. In R.J. Hartsuiker, R. Bastiaanse, A. Postma, & F. Wijnen (Eds.), Phonological encoding and monitoring in normal and pathological speech. Hove (East Sussex): Psychology Press. Van Riper, C. (1982). The Nature of Stuttering. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall. Wijnen, F. (2000). 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dc.description.volume1
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid239
rioxxterms.typebook_section
qmu.authorLickley, Robin
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number5


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