Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMartin, Douglas
dc.contributor.authorSlessor, G.
dc.contributor.authorAllen, R.
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, L. H.
dc.contributor.authorDarling, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:29:38Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:29:38Z
dc.date.issued2012-02
dc.identifierER2475
dc.identifier.citationMartin, D., Slessor, G., Allen, R., Phillips, L. & Darling, S. (2012) Processing orientation and Emotion Recognition, Emotion, vol. 12, , pp. 39-43,
dc.identifier.issn1528-3542
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0024775
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/2475
dc.description.abstractThere is evidence that some emotional expressions are characterised by diagnostic cues from individual face features. For example, an upturned mouth is indicative of happiness, while a furrowed brow is associated with anger. The current investigation explored whether motivating people to perceive stimuli in a local (i.e., feature-based) rather than global (i.e., holistic) processing orientation was advantageous for recognising emotional facial expressions. Participants classified emotional faces while primed with local and global processing orientations, via a Navon-letters task. Contrary to previous findings for identity recognition, the current findings are indicative of a modest advantage for face emotion recognition under conditions of local processing orientation. When primed with a local processing orientation, participants performed significantly better on an emotion recognition task than when they were primed with a global processing orientation. The impacts of this finding for theories of emotion recognition and face processing are considered.
dc.format.extent39-43
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association
dc.relation.ispartofEmotion
dc.subjectrecognition
dc.subjectface processing
dc.subjectprocessing orientation
dc.subjectsocial cognition
dc.titleProcessing orientation and Emotion Recognition
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultydiv_PaS
dc.description.referencetextAdolphs, R., Gosselin, F., Buchanan, T. W., Tranel, D., Schyns, P., & Damasio, A. R. (2005). A mechanism for impaired fear recognition after amygdala damage. Nature, 433, 68-72. Adolphs, R. (2002). Recognizing emotion from facial expressions: Psychological and neurological mechanisms. Behavioral Cognitive Neuroscience Reviews, 1, 21-62. Bassili, J. N. (1979). Emotion recognition - role of facial movement and the relative importance of upper and lower areas of the face. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 37, 2049-2058. Bruce, V., & Young, A. W. (1986). Understanding face recognition. British Journal of Psychology, 77, 305-327. Burgoon, J. K., & Bacue, A. E. (2003). Non-verbal communication skills. In J. O. Green, & B. R. Burleson (Eds.), Handbook of communication and social interaction skills. (pp. 179-221). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Calder, A. J., & Young, A. W. (2005). Understanding the recognition of facial identity and facial expression. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 6, 641-651. Calder, A. J., Young, A. W., Keane, J., & Dean, M. (2000). Configural information in facial expression perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology-Human Perception and Performance, 26, 527-551. Cloutier, J., Mason, M. F., & Macrae, C. N. (2005). The perceptual determinants of person construal: Reopening the social-cognitive toolbox. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 88, 885-894. Processing Orientation and Emotion Recognition 14 Ellison, J. W., & Massaro, D. W. (1997). Featural evaluation, integration, and judgment of facial affect. Journal of Experimental Psychology-Human Perception and Performance, 23, 213-226. Haxby, J. V., Hoffman, E. A., & Gobbini, M. I. (2000). The distributed human neural system for face perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 4, 223-233. H_bner, R., & Volberg, G. (2005). The integration of object levels and their content: A theory of global/local processing and related hemispheric differences. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 31, 520-41. Johnson, M. H. (2005). Subcortical face processing. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 6, 766- 774. Joyce, C. A., Schyns, P. G., Gosselin, F., Cottrell, G. W., & Rossion, B. (2006). Early selection of diagnostic facial information in the human visual cortex. Vision Research, 46, 800-813. Macrae, C. N., & Lewis, H. L. (2002). Do I know you?: Processing orientation and face recognition. Psychological Science, 13, 194-196. Macrae, C. N., & Martin, D. (2007). A boy primed sue: Feature-based processing and person construal. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 793-805. Martin, D., & Macrae, C. N. (2007). A face with a cue: Exploring the inevitability of person categorization. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 806-816. Processing Orientation and Emotion Recognition 15 Martin, D., & Macrae, C.N. (2010). Processing style and person recognition: Exploring the face inversion effect. Visual Cognition, 18, 161-170. Martinez, A., & Du, S. (2010). How fast can we recognize facial expressions of emotion? Journal of Vision, 10, 607. Morris, J. S., DeGelder, B., Weiskrantz, L., & Dolan, R. J. (2001). Differential extrageniculostriate and amygdala responses to presentation of emotional faces in a cortically blind field. Brain, 124, 1241-1252. Navon, D. (1977). Forest before trees: The precedence of global features in visual perception. Cognitive Psychology, 9, 353-383. Palermo, R., & Rhodes, G. (2007). Are you always on my mind? A review of how face perception and attention interact. Neuropsychologia, 45, 75-92. Perfect, T. J., Weston, N. J., Dennis, I., & Snell, A. (2008). The effects of precedence on navon-induced processing bias in face recognition. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 61, 1479-1486. Perfect, T. J. (2003). Local processing bias impairs lineup performance. Psychological Reports, 93, 393-394. Sullivan, S., Ruffman, T., & Hutton, S. B. (2007). Age differences in emotion recognition skills and the visual scanning of emotion faces. The Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 62B, 53-60. Tanaka, J. W., & Farah, M. J. (1993). Parts and wholes in face recognition. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology A: Human Experimental Psychology, 46, 225-245. Processing Orientation and Emotion Recognition 16 Tottenham, N., Tanaka, J. W., Leon, A. C., McCarry, T., Nurse, M., Hare, T. A., et al. (2009). The NimStim set of facial expressions: Judgments from untrained research participants. Psychiatry research, 168, 242-249. Vuilleumier, P., Armony, J. L., Driver, J., & Dolan, R. J. (2003). Distinct spatial frequency sensitivities for processing faces and emotional expressions. Nature neuroscience, 6, 624-631. Weston, N. J., & Perfect, T. J. (2005). Effects of processing bias on the recognition of composite face halves. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 12, 1038-1042. Whalen, P. J., Rauch, S. L., Etcoff, N. L., McInerney, S. C., Lee, M. B., & Jenike, M. A. (1998). Masked presentations of emotional facial expressions modulate amygdala activity without explicit knowledge. Journal of Neuroscience, 18, 411-418. White, M. (2000). Parts and wholes in expression recognition. Cognition & Emotion, 14, 39- 60. Young, A. W., Hellawell, D., & Hay, D. C. (1987). Configurational information in face perception. Perception, 16, 747. Young, A. W., Perrett, D. I., Calder, A. J., Sprengelmeyer, R., & Ekman, P. (2002). Facial expressions of emotion: Stimuli and test (FEEST).. Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, UK: Thames Valley Test Company.
dc.description.volume12
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.1037/a0024775
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid2475
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorDarling, Stephen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number1


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record