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dc.contributor.authorScandrett, Eurig
dc.contributor.authorMukherjee, Suroopa
dc.contributor.authorTeam, Bhopal Research
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:27:41Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:27:41Z
dc.date.issued2011-11
dc.identifierER2616
dc.identifier.citationScandrett, E., Mukherjee, S. & Team, B. (2011-11) We are flames not flowers-: a gendered reading of the social movement for justice in Bhopal, Interface: a journal for and about social movements, vol. 3, pp. 100-122.
dc.identifier.issn2009-2431
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.interfacejournal.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Interface-3-2-Scandrett-Mukherjee.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/2616
dc.description.abstractThis essay is in continuation of the article that Eurig Scandrett and I wrote for the previous issue of Interface (Scandrett and Mukherjee 2011). It looks at gender as one of the abstractions that arises from the material condition of the industrial disaster in Bhopal that happened on 3 December 1984, which is often compared to Hiroshima, in the nature of its destruction. Bhopal has also witnessed a grassroots movement, remarkable in its tenacity and its welldefined battle-line against the monolithic power of the State and the Corporation. The survivors' organisations present two interrelated profiles for the movement. One is local and includes a large section of women, who are illiterate and bound by patriarchy. The other is the international face of the movement. This essay looks at the role played by women in the movement. At the same time, oral history methodology highlights the vision of a gender sensitive world, which is alien to the material conditions these women live in. While academically we can bring in feminist readings, they do not serve the purpose of relating to women's consciousness and how they visualize their own emancipation. This essay looks at gender as a problematic category that needs redefinition.
dc.format.extent100-122
dc.relation.ispartofInterface: a journal for and about social movements
dc.titleWe are flames not flowers-: a gendered reading of the social movement for justice in Bhopal
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultydiv_MCaPA
dc.description.referencetextAmnesty International. 2004. Clouds of Injustice: Bhopal Disaster 20 Years On. Oxford: Amnesty International. Avasthi, Abha, and A K Srivastava (ed.) 2001. Modernity, Feminism and Women Empowerment. Jaipur: Rawat. Bannerji, Nirmala. Ed. 1991. Indian Women in Changing Industrial Scenario. Indo/Dutch Studies on Development Alternatives-5. New Delhi: Sage. Baxi, Upendra. 1986. Inconvenient Forum and Convenient Catastrophe: The Bhopal Case. The Indian Law Institute. Bombay: N M Tripathi. Bhattacharya, Malini (ed.) 2004. Perspective on Women's Studies: Globalization. School Of Women's Studies, Jadavpur University. New Delhi: Tulika Books. Bhopal Survivors' Movement Study. 2010. Bhopal Survivors Speak: Emergent Voices from a People's Movement. Edinburgh: Word Power Books. Connell, R. W. 2005. Hegemonic Masculinities: Rethinking the Concept.- Gender and Society. Sage Journals Online. Eyerman, Ron and Andrew Jamison. 1996. Social Movements: A Cognitive Approach. Pennsylvania: The Pennsylvania State University Press. Fortune, Kim. 2001. Advocacy after Bhopal: Environmentalism, Disaster, New Global Orders. Chicago: Chicago University Press. Foucault, Michel. 1969. The Archeology of Knowledge. London: Routledge Classics. Freire, Paulo. 1972. The Pedagogy of the Oppressed. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. Greenpeace. 1999. The Bhopal Legacy: Contamination at the Former Union Carbide Factory Site, Bhopal India, 15 Years after the Bhopal Accident. Publications: Greenpeace International. Harvey, David. 1995. Militant Particularism and Global Ambition: the Conceptual Politics of Place, Space and Environment in the Works of Raymond Williams.- Social Text 42 (Spring): 69 - 98. Jones, Tara. 1988. Corporate Killings: Bhopals will Happen. London: Free Association Press. Medico Friends Circle. 1990. Distorted Lives: Women's Reproductive Health and Bhopal Disaster. Pune: Medico Friend's Circle.. Mukherjee, Suroopa. 2010. Surviving Bhopal: Dancing Bodies, Written Texts, Oral Testimonials of Women in the Wake of an Industrial Disaster. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Ramaswamy, Uma, Bhanumathy Vasudevan, Anuradha Prasad, Gagan Sethi, and Sulagna Sengupta. 2000. Restructuring Gender Towards Collaboration. Bangalore: Books for Change. Ramaswamy. Vijaya. Ed. 2003. Researching Indian Women. Delhi: Manohar. Rowbotham, Sheila and Stephanie Linkogle (ed.) 2001. Women Resist Globalization: Mobilizing for Livelihood and Rights. London: Zed Books. Saksena, Anu. 2004. Gender and Human Rights: Status of Women Workers in India, New Delhi: Shipra. Scandrett, Eurig and Mukherjee, Suroopa 2011. Globalisation and abstraction in the Bhopal survivors' movement-. Interface 3(1): 195 - 209 Tilly, Charles. 2008. Contentious Performances. New York: Cambridge University Press. Zavestokski, Stephen. 2009. The Struggle for Justice in Bhopal: A New/Old Breed of Transnational Social Movement.- Global Social Policy, 9: 383
dc.description.volume3
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dc.description.eprintid2616
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorScandrett, Eurig
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number2


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