Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorConsultancy team from Queen Margaret University College
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:54:08Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:54:08Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifierER27
dc.identifier.citation(2003) A Scottish Executive review of speech and language therapy, physiotherapy and occupational therapy for children and speech and language therapy for adults with learning disabilities and autistic spectrum disorder, , , no. 144, ,
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2003/08/18065/25750
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/27
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND TO THE REVIEW 1. In early 2002, the Scottish Executive embarked on a national review of Speech and Language Therapy, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy for children and Speech and Language Therapy for adults with learning disabilities. 2. The review was called in response to a number of concerns: There has been a significant increase in funding for Speech and Language Therapy for children with records of needs in recent years yet children still find it difficult to access services. The Riddell Advisory Committee Report 1 into the Education of Children with Severe and Low Incidence Disabilities (SLID) highlighted the problem of shortages of therapists leading to unacceptable waiting times for children with SLID. It raised questions about the current management and organisation of therapists and reported some dissatisfaction with funding mechanisms. The report of the Learning Disabilities Review, The same as you?2 stated that adults with learning disabilities found it difficult to access Speech and Language Therapy. It recommended that the review of children's therapy recommended by the Riddell Committee 1 should be extended to cover Speech and Language Therapy for adults with learning difficulties. 3. The review, therefore, intended to address issues such as continued shortages of therapists, the management of therapy provision and current funding mechanisms particularly for children's therapy. 4. The review was guided by a steering group made up of representatives from the Scottish Executive Education Department and the Scottish Executive Health Department as well as advisors from a number of stakeholder groups (see Appendix A for membership). 5. Queen Margaret University College provided consultancy to the review team. The University College undertook an investigation of Speech and Language Therapy, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy for children and Speech and Language Therapy for adults with learning disabilities as part of the review. The investigation is described in Chapter 4. In addition, a focus group was organised by the Scottish Consortium of Learning Disability to seek the views of adults with learning disabilities who use Speech and Language Therapy. The views of parents were fed into the review by the parent representative on the steering group.
dc.format.extent144
dc.publisherScottish Executive Publications
dc.publisherQueen Margaret University College
dc.titleA Scottish Executive review of speech and language therapy, physiotherapy and occupational therapy for children and speech and language therapy for adults with learning disabilities and autistic spectrum disorder
dc.typemonograph
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultycasl
dc.description.referencetext1 Scottish Executive (1999) The Riddell Advisory Committee Report on Education of Children with Severe Low Incidence Disabilities. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 2 Scottish Executive (2000) The same as you? A review of services for people with learning disabilities. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 3 General Register for Scotland (GROS) (2002) 2001 Population Report. Edinburgh: GROS. 4 Scottish Executive Education Department (2002) Statistical Bulletin Edn/B1/2002/3. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 5 Stalker K (2000) Supporting Disabled Children and their Families in Scotland: A Review of Policy and Research. Foundations Series N90. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 6 Joseph Rowntree Foundation (1999) Supporting Disabled Children and their Families. Foundations Series N79. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation. 7 Scottish Executive (2001) For Scotland's Children: Better Integrated Children's Services. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 8 McGrother, CW and Thorp, CF (1999) Planning and Research Information to improve services for people with learning disabilities, Annual Scientific Meeting of the Faculty of Public Health Medicine, Glasgow. 9 Mansell J (1993) Services for people with learning disability and challenging behaviour and mental health needs: Report of a Project Group. London: HMSO. 10 Van der Gaag A. (1998) Communication Skills and Adults with Learning Disabilities: Eliminating Professional Myopia. BILD Keynote Reviews, British Journal of Learning Disabilities, 26(3), 88-93. 11 Public Health Institute of Scotland (2001) Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Needs Assessment Report. Glasgow: PHIS. 12 Scottish Executive (2000) Standards in Scotland's Schools Etc. Act Edinburgh: Scottish Executive Education Department. 13 Stalker K and Jones C (1998) Normalisation and critical disability theory. In: Jones D, Blair SEE, Hartery T and Jones RK (eds.) Sociology and Occupational Therapy. An Integrated Approach. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. 14 Wolfensberger W (1972) The principle of normalisation in human services. Toronto, National Institute on Mental Retardation. 15 O'Brien J (1987) A guide to lifestyle planning: suing the activities catalogue to integrate services and natural support systems. In: Wilcox BW and Bellamy GT (eds.) The activities catalogue: an alternative curriculum for youth and adults with severe disabilities. Baltimore, MD: Brookes. 16 Scottish Executive (2001) Making inclusion in the classroom a reality for Scottish pupils. Press Release SE0029/2001. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 17 Education (Disability Strategies and Pupils' Educational Records) (Scotland) Act 2002 asp 12. Edinburgh: HMSO. 18 Special Needs and Disability Act (2001) London: HMSO. 19 Scottish Executive (2001) Assessing our children's educational needs. The Way Forward. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 20 Scottish Executive (2001) Assessing our children's educational needs. The Way Forward. Scottish Executive Response to the Consultation. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 21 Scottish Executive (1999) Implementing Inclusiveness: Realising Potential. Report of the Beattie Committee. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 22 Department of Health (2001) Valuing People: A New Strategy for Learning Disability for the 21st Century. CM 5086. London: HMSO. 23 Information and Statistics Division, NHSiS (1981) Scottish Health Statistics 1979, Edinburgh: ISD. 24 Information and Statistics Division, NHSiS (2002) Scottish Health Statistics 2000, Edinburgh: ISD. 25 Pope C, Ziebland S and Mays N (2000) Qualitative research in health care: analysing qualitative data. British Medical Journal 320: 114-116. 26 Hall E and Social Work Services Inspectorate (2001) Equipment and Adaptation Services in Scotland: A Survey of Waiting Times for Social Work Provision. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive Central Research Unit. 27 Scottish Executive (2001) Staff of Scottish Local Authority Social Work Services, 2000. Scottish Executive National Statistics Publication. Statistical Bulletin: Social Work Series, SWK/S/2001/23. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 28 Review of Care Management in Scotland, Scottish Executive Central Research Unit, 2002. 29 ISD (2000) Professions Allied to Medicine employed by the NHS in Scotland 1990-1999: a Health Briefing. No. 00/07. Edinburgh: ISD. 30 Scottish Executive (2000) Our National Health: A Plan for Action, A Plan for Change. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 31 Ritchie P, Christie S and Wilson E (1996) Population Needs Assessment in Community Care. A Handbook for Planners and Practitioners. Edinburgh: Social Work Services Inspectorate for Scotland. 32 Scottish Executive (2002) Planning Together. Final Report of the Scottish Integrated Workforce Planning Group and Response by Scottish Executive Health Department. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 33 Scottish Executive (2002) Building on Success: Future Directions for the Allied Health Professions in Scotland. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 34 Scottish Executive (2002) Working for health: the workforce development action plan for NHS Scotland. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 35 Department of Health (2000) Meeting the Challenge: a strategy for the Allied Health Professions. London: DoH. 36 Review Body for Nursing Staff, Midwives, Health Visitors and Professions Allied to Medicine (2002) Nineteenth report on professions allied to medicine CM5346. 37 Speech and Language Therapy Working Party (1999) Speech and Language Therapy For Children - Whose Responsibility? A perspective from Speech and Therapists Across Scotland. 38 Scottish Executive (2000) A teaching profession for the 21st Century. The McCrone Report. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive. 39 Scottish Executive (2001) Patient Focus and Public Involvement. Edinburgh, Scottish Executive.
dc.contributor.sponsorScottish Executive
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid27
rioxxterms.typemonograph
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statuspub


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record