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dc.contributor.authorStuart-Smith, Jane
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Eleanor
dc.contributor.authorScobbie, James M.
dc.contributor.editorCalmai, S.
dc.contributor.editorCelata, C.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:53:15Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:53:15Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-12
dc.identifierER3084
dc.identifier.citationStuart-Smith, J., Lawson, E. & Scobbie, J. M. (2014) Derhoticisation in Scottish English: a sociophonetic journey. In: Celata, C. & Calamai, S. (eds.) Advances in Sociophonetics. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp. 59-96.
dc.identifier.isbn9789027234957
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1075/silv.15.03stu
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/3084
dc.descriptionItem deposited in University of Glasgow (Enlighten) repository on 10 April 2014, available at: http://eprints.gla.ac.uk/87460/
dc.description.abstractSociophonetic variation presents us with challenges and opportunities. This paper focuses on an area of phonetic variation which is particularly rich and informative about the social exploitation of the complexities of the acoustics-articulatory relationship - namely fine-grained variation and change in Scottish English coda /r/. Scottish English is typically thought to be 'rhotic' (e.g. Wells 1982), such that postvocalic /r/ in words such as car, card, and better are realized with some kind of articulated rhotic consonant (approximant, tap, and exceptionally a trill). This paper presents historical and more recent sociophonetic data from the Central Belt of Scotland (from Edinburgh to Glasgow), which show auditory/impressionistic, acoustic, and articulatory evidence of derhoticisation (e.g. Stuart-Smith 2003; Stuart-Smith et al 2007; Lawson et al 2011a; Lawson et al 2011). Derhoticisation is especially evident in working-class speakers, whilst middle-class speakers are developing auditorily 'stronger' rhotics and merging vowels before /r/. We consider the geographical and social distribution of the rhotic-derhotic continuum in these varieties and the linguistic and sociolinguistic factors involved, and the evidence to date that exists from speech perception and social evaluation of speech. We conclude by considering how sociophonological detail and abstraction are encoded in mental representations (cf e.g. Johnson 2006).
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research presented here was supported by awards to Jane Stuart-Smith from the Leverhulme Trust (F/179/AX), the AHRC, and the ESRC (R000239757), and to James M. Scobbie and Jane Stuart-Smith, from the ESRC,RES-000-22-2032 and RES-062-23-3246.
dc.format.extent59-96
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Sociophonetics
dc.relation.ispartofseriesStudies in Language Variation; 15
dc.rightsCopyright © 2013 The Authors
dc.titleDerhoticisation in Scottish English: a sociophonetic journey
dc.typebook_section
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultycasl
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid3084
rioxxterms.typebook_section
qmu.authorScobbie, James M.
qmu.authorLawson, Eleanor
qmu.centreCASL
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statuspub


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