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dc.contributor.authorScott, S. M.
dc.contributor.authorvan der Linden, Marietta
dc.contributor.authorHooper, Julie
dc.contributor.authorCowan, P.
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:45:48Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:45:48Z
dc.date.issued2013-03
dc.identifierER3130
dc.identifier.citationScott, S., van der Linden, M., Hooper, J., Cowan, P. & Mercer, T. (2013) Quantification of gait kinematics and walking ability of people with multiple sclerosis who are new users of functional electrical stimulation, Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, vol. 45, , pp. 364-369,
dc.identifier.issn1650-1977
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.medicaljournals.se/jrm/content/?doi=10.2340/16501977-1109
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/3130
dc.description.abstractObjective: To assess whether the application of Functional Electrical Stimulation improves gait kinematics and walking ability in people with multiple sclerosis who experience foot drop. Design: Acute open labelled comparative observation trial. Participants: Twelve people (3 females, 9 males, EDSS 2-4) with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (47.8 years (standard deviation 6.6)) who were new users of functional electrical stimulation. Methods: Gait kinematics were recorded using 3D gait analysis. Walking ability was assessed through the 10-m walk test and the 6-min walk test. All assessments were performed with and without the assistance of functional electrical stimulation. The effect of functional electrical stimulation was analysed using paired t-tests. Results: Ankle dorsiflexion at initial contact (p-=-0.026), knee flexion at initial contact (p-=-0.044) and peak knee flexion during swing (p-=-0.011) were significantly greater whilst walking with Functional Electrical Stimulation. The increased peak dorsiflexion in swing of nearly 4 degrees during functional electrical stimulation assisted walking approached significance (p-=-0.069). The 10-m walk time was significantly improved by functional electrical stimulation (p-=-0.004) but the 6 min walk test was not. Conclusion: The acute application of functional electrical stimulation resulted in an orthotic effect through a change in ankle and knee kinematics and increased walking speed over a short distance in people with multiple sclerosis who experience foot drop
dc.format.extent364-369
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Rehabilitation Medicine
dc.titleQuantification of gait kinematics and walking ability of people with multiple sclerosis who are new users of functional electrical stimulation
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysch_phy
dc.description.volume45
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid3130
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorMercer, Tom
qmu.authorvan der Linden, Marietta
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number4


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