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dc.contributor.authorGleeson, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorEston, R.
dc.contributor.authorMinshull, Claire
dc.contributor.authorBailey, A.
dc.contributor.authorAl Kitani, Abdul Hameed
dc.contributor.authorDarain, Haider
dc.contributor.authorYates, C.
dc.contributor.authorRees, D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:46:03Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:46:03Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifierER3346
dc.identifier.citationGleeson, N., Eston, R., Minshull, C., Bailey, A., Al Kitani, A., Darain, H., Yates, C. & Rees, D. (2013) Effects of antecedent flexibility conditioning on neuromuscular and sensorimotor performance during exercise-induced muscle damage, Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness, vol. 11, , pp. 107-117,
dc.identifier.issn1728-869X
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jesf.2013.11.003
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/3346
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to assess the effects of two modes of antecedent flexibility conditioning on neuromuscular and sensorimotor performance during a subsequent episode of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). Twenty-four males (age 20.9 2.3 years; height 1.78 0.06 m; body mass 72.3 7.4 kg, mean SD) were randomly assigned to interventions comprising 6 weeks of thrice-weekly flexibility conditioning of the hip region and knee flexor musculature in the dominant limb involving proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (n = 8), passive exercise (n = 8), or no exercise as a control (n = 8). Musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, and sensorimotor assessments were carried out at baseline, after conditioning, and before and up to 168 hours after damaging exercise of the ipsilateral knee flexors. Flexibility conditioning and EIMD elicited transient performance decreases in volitional electromechanical delay (up to 40.1% compared to baseline; 67.5 12.3 milliseconds vs. 47.9 9.7 milliseconds, mean SD, 48-hour post- vs. pre-EIMD; p < 0.01), passive hip flexibility (up to 19.9%; 96.7 8.2 vs. 120.7 11.0, p < 0.001) and sensorimotor capability (manifold error increase to 10.8%; 10.8% 6.9% vs. 0.3% 3.7%, p < 0.05) and exceeded the effects of eccentric exercise alone. EIMD-related performance decreases were especially prominent when preceded by passive flexibility conditioning, and were sufficiently potent following both modes of antecedent conditioning to raise concerns about compromised capability for rapid and dynamic stabilization of synovial joints. 2013.
dc.format.extent107-117
dc.publisherHong Kong Association of Sports Medicine & Sports Science
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Exercise Science and Fitness
dc.titleEffects of antecedent flexibility conditioning on neuromuscular and sensorimotor performance during exercise-induced muscle damage
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_phy
dc.description.volume11
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid3346
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorDarain, Haider
qmu.authorGleeson, Nigel
qmu.authorMinshull, Claire
qmu.authorAl Kitani, Abdul Hameed
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number2


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