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dc.contributor.authorGreenwood, S.
dc.contributor.authorKoufaki, Pelagia
dc.contributor.authorRush, Robert
dc.contributor.authorMacdougall, I. C.
dc.contributor.authorMercer, Tom
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:45:49Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:45:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-12
dc.identifierER3493
dc.identifier.citationGreenwood, S., Koufaki, P., Rush, R., Macdougall, I. & Mercer, T. (2014) Exercise counselling practices for patients with chronic kidney disease in the UK: A renal multidisciplinary team perspective, Nephron Clinical Practice, vol. 128, , pp. 67-72,
dc.identifier.issn1660-8151, ESSN: 1660-2110
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1159/000363453
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/3493
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Physical activity (PA) is a strong and independent CVD risk factor, and despite the fact that current clinical practice guidelines recommend simultaneous treatment of multiple risk factors for optimum management of CKD, PA is rarely addressed by renal care teams. The aim of this observational cross-sectional survey was to document current exercise/PA practices across renal units in the UK, and capture views and experiences regarding the provision of PA/exercise options for patients with CKD. Methods: An 18-item online survey questionnaire regarding exercise counselling practice patterns was administered to 565 multidisciplinary renal care professionals. Results: 142 individuals (25% response rate) completed the questionnaire. Overall, 42% of respondents discussed and encouraged PA, but only 18 and 11% facilitated implementation of PA for their patients. Nephrologists (p < 0.003) were more likely to prescribe or recommend PA compared to professionals with a nursing background and believed that specific renal rehabilitation services, including an active PA/exercise component, should be available to all patients (p < 0.01). The most commonly reported barriers for the development and implementation of PA/exercise options included lack of funding, time, and knowledgeable personnel, such as physiotherapists or other exercise professionals. Conclusion: Beliefs and attitudes towards PA amongst members of the renal multidisciplinary team are encouraging. However there is a big gap between believing in the benefits of PA and promoting/implementing PA for patient benefit. This gap needs to be minimised by at least trying to address some of the reported barriers. 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel
dc.format.extent67-72
dc.publisherKarger
dc.relation.ispartofNephron Clinical Practice
dc.titleExercise counselling practices for patients with chronic kidney disease in the UK: A renal multidisciplinary team perspective
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_phy
dc.description.volume128
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.1159/000363453
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid3493
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorMercer, Tom
qmu.authorKoufaki, Pelagia
qmu.authorRush, Robert
qmu.centreCentre for Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number01-Feb


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