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dc.contributor.authorWolters, M.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Christine
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, P.
dc.contributor.authorDePlacido, Christine
dc.contributor.authorMcKinstry, B.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:51:14Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:51:14Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-30
dc.identifierER3536
dc.identifier.citationWolters, M., Johnson, C., Campbell, P., DePlacido, C. & McKinstry, B. (2014) Can older people remember medication reminders presented using synthetic speech?, Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA, vol. 22, , pp. 35-42,
dc.identifier.issn1067-5027; Online ISSN: 1527-974X
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/amiajnl-2014-002820
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/3536
dc.description.abstractReminders are often part of interventions to help older people adhere to complicated medication regimes. Computer-generated (synthetic) speech is ideal for tailoring reminders to different medication regimes. Since synthetic speech may be less intelligible than human speech, in particular under difficult listening conditions, we assessed how well older people can recall synthetic speech reminders for medications. 44 participants aged 50-80 with no cognitive impairment recalled reminders for one or four medications after a short distraction. We varied background noise, speech quality, and message design. Reminders were presented using a human voice and two synthetic voices. Data were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. Reminder recall was satisfactory if reminders were restricted to one familiar medication, regardless of the voice used. Repeating medication names supported recall of lists of medications. We conclude that spoken reminders should build on familiar information and be integrated with other adherence support measures. The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comFor numbered affiliations see end of article.
dc.format.extent35-42
dc.publisherBMJ
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association: JAMIA
dc.titleCan older people remember medication reminders presented using synthetic speech?
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultycasl
dc.description.volume22
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.1136/amiajnl-2014-002820
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid3536
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2014-07-03
qmu.authorDePlacido, Christine
qmu.authorJohnson, Christine
qmu.centreCASL
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number1


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