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dc.contributor.authorJannetts, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorSchaeffler, Felix
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:53:38Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:53:38Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifierER3922
dc.identifier.citationJannetts, S. & Schaeffler, F. (2015) Cepstral Peak Prominence-Based Phonation Stabilisation Time as an Indicator of Voice Disorder, , , , ,
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/3922
dc.descriptionThis is an extended abstract accepted for oral presentation at the joint conference PEVOC & MAVEBA 2015.
dc.description.abstractA common feature of voice disorders is the impairment of the ability to initiate and sustain adequately periodic vocal fold vibrations. Traditional acoustic approaches that use sustained vowels in which initial/final portions are excluded have been criticised for poor validity and for exclusion of factors that may be a rich source of clinically relevant data e.g. regarding the onset of vocal fold vibration. The aim of this study was to establish if phonation stabilisation time (PST), as determined by cepstal peak prominence (CPP), is useful as an indicator of voice disorders in connected speech. Disordered voices from all groups showed a significantly longer mean PST than normal voices from the same group. The proportion of voiced segments that reached the stable threshold of periodicity were significantly higher for normal voices in all groups. Our results indicate that PST using CPP has potential to differentiate between the normal and disordered voices. The results for the 'below threshold' groups for both male and female are of particular interest. These results suggest that PST using CPP may be a potential indicator of voice disorder in cases where traditional acoustic analysis measures of sustained vowels do not show any pathological findings.
dc.subjectAcoustic Analysis
dc.subjectVoice Disorder
dc.titleCepstral Peak Prominence-Based Phonation Stabilisation Time as an Indicator of Voice Disorder
dc.typeconference_item
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultycasl
dc.description.referencetextBaken, R.J. & Orlikoff, R.F., 2000. Clinical measurement of speech and voice, San Diego: Singular Publishing. Crystal, T.H. & House, A.S., 1988. Segmental durations in connected-speech signals: Current results. The journal of the acoustical society of America, 83(4), pp.1553-1573. Gordon, M. & Ladefoged, P., 2001. Phonation types: a cross-linguistic overview. Journal of Phonetics, 29(4), pp.383-406. Maryn, Y. & Roy, N., 2012. Sustained vowels and continuous speech in the auditory-perceptual evaluation of dysphonia severity. Jornal da Sociedade Brasileira de Fonoaudiologia, 24(2), pp.107-12. Schaeffler, F., Beck, J. & Jannetts, S., 2015. Phonation Stabilisation Time as an Indicator of Voice Disorder. ICPhS [submitted]. Takahashi, H. & Koike, Y., 1976. Some perceptual dimensions and acoustical correlates of pathologic voices. Acta oto-laryngologica. Supplementum, 338, pp.1-24.
dc.contributor.sponsorQueen Margaret University
dc.description.ispublishedsubmitted
dc.description.eprintid3922
rioxxterms.typeconference_item
refterms.dateFCA2017-02-02
refterms.dateFCD2017-02-02
qmu.authorSchaeffler, Felix
qmu.authorJannetts, Stephen
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statussubmitted


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