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dc.contributor.authorBuetow, Stephen A.
dc.contributor.authorKiata, L.
dc.contributor.authorLiew, T.
dc.contributor.authorKenealy, T.
dc.contributor.authorDovey, S.
dc.contributor.authorElwyn, G.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:36:44Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:36:44Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifierER4165
dc.identifier.citationBuetow, S., Kiata, L., Liew, T., Kenealy, T., Dovey, S. & Elwyn, G. (2009) Patient Error: A Preliminary Taxonomy, The Annals of Family Medicine, vol. 7, , pp. 223-231,
dc.identifier.issn1544-1709
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1370/afm.941
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4165
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE Current research on errors in health care focuses almost exclusively on system and clinician error. It tends to exclude how patients may create errors that influence their health. We aimed to identify the types of errors that patients can contribute and help manage, especially in primary care. METHODS Eleven nominal group interviews of patients and primary health care professionals were held in Auckland, New Zealand, during late 2007. Group members reported and helped to classify types of potential error by patients. We synthesized the ideas that emerged from the nominal groups into a taxonomy of patient error. RESULTS Our taxonomy is a 3-level system encompassing 70 potential types of patient error. The first level classifies 8 categories of error into 2 main groups: action errors and mental errors. The action errors, which result in part or whole from patient behavior, are attendance errors, assertion errors, and adherence errors. The mental errors, which are errors in patient thought processes, comprise memory errors, mindfulness errors, misjudgments, and-more distally-knowledge deficits and attitudes not conducive to health. CONCLUSION The taxonomy is an early attempt to understand and recognize how patients may err and what clinicians should aim to influence so they can help patients act safely. This approach begins to balance perspectives on error but requires further research. There is a need to move beyond seeing patient, clinician, and system errors as separate categories of error. An important next step may be research that attempts to understand how patients, clinicians, and systems interact to cocreate and reduce errors.
dc.format.extent223-231
dc.relation.ispartofThe Annals of Family Medicine
dc.titlePatient Error: A Preliminary Taxonomy
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_nur
dc.description.volume7
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.1370/afm.941
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4165
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorBuetow, Stephen A.
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number3


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