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dc.contributor.authorKagan, Sarah H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:36:28Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:36:28Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifierER4175
dc.identifier.citationKagan, S. (2008) Ageism in Cancer Care, Seminars in Oncology Nursing, vol. 24, , pp. 246-253,
dc.identifier.issn7492081
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soncn.2008.08.004
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4175
dc.description.abstractObjective To provide an overview of ageism, a review of its influence in cancer, and to outline implications for nursing and interdisciplinary practice. Data Sources Research articles, research and clinical reviews, theoretical works, and clinical expertise. Conclusion Ageism may be negative, self-stereotyping, positive, or beneficent. Ageism in cancer care results in age-based disparities in screening and detection, where older adults may have some advantage over younger adults as they have more frequent health care encounters through clinical trials enrollment and treatment. Implications for Nursing Practice Nurses are well-positioned to identify ageism, to confront and correct it in clinical practice, and to conduct investigations and create curricula that combat ageism and redress age-based disparities.
dc.format.extent246-253
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relation.ispartofSeminars in Oncology Nursing
dc.titleAgeism in Cancer Care
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_nur
dc.description.volume24
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.1016/j.soncn.2008.08.004
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4175
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorKagan, Sarah H.
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number4


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