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dc.contributor.authorAdam, R.
dc.contributor.authorGiatsi Clausen, Maria
dc.contributor.authorHall, S.
dc.contributor.authorMurchie, P.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:40:49Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:40:49Z
dc.date.issued2015-11
dc.identifierER4187
dc.identifier.citationAdam, R., Giatsi Clausen, M., Hall, S. & Murchie, P. (2015) Utilising out-of-hours primary care for assistance with cancer pain: a semi-structured interview study of patient and caregiver experiences, British Journal of General Practice, vol. 65, , pp. e754-e760,
dc.identifier.issn0960-1643
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3399/bjgp15X687397
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4187
dc.description.abstractBackground Pain is the most frequent complication of cancer and an important reason for out-of-hours (OOH) primary care contacts by patients with established cancer. Existing quantitative data give little insight into the reason for these contacts. Exploring such encounters of care could highlight ways to improve anticipatory cancer care and communication between daytime and OOH primary care services. Aim To explore the experiences, views, and opinions of patients and their caregivers who have used OOH primary care for help with managing cancer pain. Design and setting A semi-structured interview study with patients and caregivers who have utilised an OOH primary care service in Grampian, Scotland, because of pain related to cancer. Method Semi-structured interviews with 11 patients and four caregivers (n = 15), transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis and, to a lesser extent, inductive thematic analysis. Results Six key themes emerged: making sense of pain and predicting its likely course; beliefs about analgesics; priority daytime access; the importance of continuity of care and communication between all involved; barriers and facilitators to seeking help in the OOH period; and satisfaction/dissatisfaction with OOH care. Three prominent sub-themes were: patient knowledge; the influence of a caregiver on decision-making; and the benefits of having a palliative care summary. Conclusion Effective daytime and anticipatory care can positively influence OOH care. Interventions that aid patients in understanding cancer pain, communicating about pain, utilising analgesics effectively, and seeking appropriate and timely help may improve cancer pain management.
dc.description.abstractAbout the book: Kinanthropometry is the study of human body size, shape and form and how those characteristics relate to human movement and sporting performance. In this fully updated and revised edition of the classic guide to kinanthropometric theory and practice, leading international sport and exercise scientists offer a clear and comprehensive introduction to essential principles and techniques.
dc.format.extente754-e760
dc.publisherRoyal College of General Practitioners
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of General Practice
dc.titleUtilising out-of-hours primary care for assistance with cancer pain: a semi-structured interview study of patient and caregiver experiences
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_occ
dc.description.volume65
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.3399/bjgp15X687397
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4187
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorGiatsi Clausen, Maria
qmu.centreCentre for Person-centred Practise Research
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number640


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