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dc.contributor.authorFinlay, K. A.
dc.contributor.authorWilson, J. A.
dc.contributor.authorGaston, P.
dc.contributor.authorAl-Dujaili, Emad A. S.
dc.contributor.authorPower, I.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:34:16Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:34:16Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-01
dc.identifierER4355
dc.identifier.citationFinlay, K., Wilson, J., Gaston, P., Al-Dujaili, E. & Power, I. (2015) Post-operative pain management through audio-analgesia: Investigating musical constructs, Psychology of Music, vol. 44, , pp. 493-513,
dc.identifier.issn0305-7356
dc.identifier.urihttp://doi.org/10.1177/0305735615577247
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4355
dc.description.abstractDistraction and attention-diversion approaches are widely integrated into pain management. Music-induced analgesia, the ability of music to reduce pain perception, is a clinically-relevant approach for managing pain, anxiety and psychological well-being. Research categorizes audio-analgesic interventions as homogenous, however enquiry is required to identify which musical constructs may be therapeutically effective. This study investigated the impact of harmony and rhythm on acute, post-operative pain in a sample of 98 patients scheduled for knee surgery. Four music-listening groups were compared against controls using silent relaxation. After surgery using standardized anaesthesia, participants undertook a 15-minute intervention per day of in-patient stay. Measures of pain intensity, pain interference, salivary cortisol concentration and mood were obtained. All participants showed reductions in pain from pre- to post-test, indicating silent relaxation was as effective as music-listening. Salivary cortisol concentrations showed that music with high harmonicity/rhythmicity reduced cortisol concentration to a greater extent on Day 1 than music with low harmonicity/rhythmicity. These findings validate the homogenous use of auditory distraction for audio-analgesia, and importantly emphasize the core role of compositional musical constructs in maximizing early postoperative recovery. Results support the need for additional psychobiological research examining the efficacy of audio-analgesic attention-diversion interventions used in pain management. The Author(s) 2015.
dc.format.extent493-513
dc.publisherSAGE
dc.relation.ispartofPsychology of Music
dc.titlePost-operative pain management through audio-analgesia: Investigating musical constructs
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_die
dc.description.volume44
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.1177/0305735615577247
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4355
rioxxterms.typearticle
qmu.authorAl-Dujaili, Emad A. S.
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number3


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