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dc.contributor.authorBissiri, Maria Paola
dc.contributor.authorZellers, M.
dc.contributor.authorDing, H.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:51:43Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:51:43Z
dc.date.issued2014-05-20
dc.identifierER4421
dc.identifier.citationBissiri, M., Zellers, M. & Ding, H. (3914) Perception of Glottalization in Varying Pitch Contexts in Mandarin Chinese, Proceedings of the International Conference on Speech Prosody, pp. 633-637.
dc.identifier.isbn2333-2042
dc.identifier.issn23332042
dc.identifier.urihttp://ifla.uni-stuttgart.de/files/bissiri-zellers-ding-sp-2014-submitted-4.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4421
dc.description.abstractAlthough glottalization has often been associated with low pitch, evidence from a number of sources supports the assertion that this association is not obligatory, and is likely to be language-specific. Following a previous study testing perception of glottalization by German, English, and Swedish listeners, the current research investigates the influence of pitch context on the perception of glottalization by native speakers of a tone language, Mandarin Chinese. Listeners heard AXB sets in which they were asked to match glottalized stimuli with pitch contours. We find that Mandarin listeners tend not to be influenced by the pitch context when judging the pitch of glottalized stretches of speech. These data lend support to the idea that the perception of glottalization varies in relation to language-specific prosodic structure.
dc.format.extent633-637
dc.publisherInternational Speech Communications Association
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the International Conference on Speech Prosody
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of Speech Prosody 2014, May 2014, Dublin, Ireland.
dc.subjectAlthough Glottalization Has Often Been Associated With Low Pitch
dc.subjectEvidence From A Number Of Sources Supports The Assertion That This Association Is Not Obligatory
dc.subjectAnd Is Likely To Be Language-Specific. Following A Previous Study Testing Perception Of Glottalization By German
dc.subjectEnglish
dc.subjectAnd Swedish Listeners
dc.subjectThe Current Research Investigates The Influence Of Pitch Context On The Perception Of Glottalization By Native Speakers Of A Tone Language
dc.subjectMandarin Chinese. Listeners Heard Axb Sets In Which They Were Asked To Match Glottalized Stimuli With Pitch Contours. We Find That Mandarin Listeners Tend Not To Be Influenced By The Pitch Context When Judging The Pitch Of Glottalized Stretches Of Speech. These Data Lend Support To The Idea That The Perception Of Glottalization Varies In Relation To Language-Specific Prosodic Structure.
dc.titlePerception of Glottalization in Varying Pitch Contexts in Mandarin Chinese
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultycasl
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dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4421
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateFCA2016-08-16
refterms.dateFCD2016-08-15
qmu.authorBissiri, Maria Paola
qmu.centreCASL
dc.description.statuspub


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