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dc.contributor.authorPaciarotti, Ilenia
dc.contributor.authorRevuelta-Iniesta, Raquel
dc.contributor.authorMcKenzie, Jane
dc.contributor.authorBrand, Celia
dc.contributor.authorRichard, Chin FM
dc.contributor.authorBrougham, Mark FH
dc.contributor.authorWilson, David C.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:33:14Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:33:14Z
dc.date.issued2015-12
dc.identifierER4423
dc.identifier.citationPaciarotti, I., Revuelta-Iniesta, R., McKenzie, J., Brand, C., Richard, C., Brougham, M. & Wilson, D. (2015) Low Plasma Vitamin D (25-Hydroxycholecalciferol) in Children and Adolescents Diagnosed with Cancer: A Case-Control Study, EC Nutrition, vol. 3, , pp. 513-520,
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.ecronicon.com/ecnu/nutrition-ECNU-03-000072.php
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4423
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Children and young people with cancer are less likely to spend time outdoors and they may also have a limited dietary intake. In addition, some cancer treatments can increase vitamin D catabolism. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate if there was an increased risk of poor vitamin D status in newly diagnosed childhood cancer patients compared to healthy controls in Scotland. Methods: Plasma 25 (OH) D was measured in children and adolescents during initial cancer treatment and compared to 33 healthy controls. Vitamin D deficiency was classified as plasma 25 (OH) D <25 nmol/l, with a plasma 25 (OH) D of 25-49 nmol/l classified as insufficient. Results: Forty-one patients (median age 3.8 years, IQR 1.9-8.0) were diagnosed with cancer, 63% were male. Twenty-three (56 %) had solid tumours, 18 (44%) had haematological cancers. Median (IQR) plasma 25 (OH) D at recruitment was 37.0 nmol/l (23.7-58.2). Ten patients (24%) had vitamin D deficiency and 17 (41%) patients were classified as insufficient. The median (IQR) plasma 25 (OH) D in the control group (n = 33) was 37.5 nmol/l (29.0-58.0). Six controls (18%) had vitamin D deficiency and 14 (42%) were classified as having insufficient results. Plasma 25 (OH) D did not differ (p > 0.05) between the patients and the controls. Conclusions: Almost three in four Scottish children treated for cancer had vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency; there was no increased risk of poor vitamin D status compared to healthy controls. Assessment of vitamin D status at diagnosis and in response to the course of treatment appears necessary to optimise nutritional management.
dc.format.extent513-520
dc.publisherECronicon
dc.relation.ispartofEC Nutrition
dc.titleLow Plasma Vitamin D (25-Hydroxycholecalciferol) in Children and Adolescents Diagnosed with Cancer: A Case-Control Study
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysch_die
dc.description.projectsThe determinants of nutritional risk in children and young people with cancer
dc.description.volume3
dc.contributor.sponsorFergus Maclay Leukaemia Trust
dc.contributor.sponsorGI-Nutrition Research fund of Child Life and Health
dc.contributor.sponsorRoald Dahl Marvellous Children's Charity
dc.contributor.sponsorthe Burdett Trust for Nursing
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4423
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2015-11-24
qmu.authorMcKenzie, Jane
qmu.authorPaciarotti, Ilenia
qmu.authorRevuelta-Iniesta, Raquel
qmu.centreCentre for Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number1


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