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dc.contributor.authorEzzo, J.
dc.contributor.authorManheimer, E.
dc.contributor.authorMcNeely, M. L.
dc.contributor.authorHowell, D. M.
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, R.
dc.contributor.authorJohansson, K. I.
dc.contributor.authorBao, T.
dc.contributor.authorBily, L.
dc.contributor.authorTuppo, C. M.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Anne F.
dc.contributor.authorKaradibak, D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:36:51Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:36:51Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-21
dc.identifierER4539
dc.identifier.citationEzzo, J., Manheimer, E., McNeely, M., Howell, D., Weiss, R., Johansson, K., Bao, T., Bily, L., Tuppo, C., Williams, A. & Karadibak, D. (2015) Manual lymph drainage for lymphedema following breast cancer treatment, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, , , ,
dc.identifier.issn1464-780X
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.cd003475.pub2
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4539
dc.description.abstractBackground More than one in five of breast cancer patients will develop breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). BCRL is a swelling that can occur in the arm, breast, or chest wall as a result of breast cancer surgery and/or radiation therapy. BCRL can negatively impact comfort, function, and quality of life Manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) is a hands-on therapy that is commonly used for BCRL and often as part of complex decongestive therapy (CDT). CDT consists of MLD, compression bandaging, lymph-reducing exercises (LREs), and skin care. The Review Questions Is MLD safe and effective in treating BCRL? Study Characteristics We found six trials published through May, 2013, totaling 208 participants. Key Results When women were treated with a course of intensive compression bandaging, their swelling went down about 30% to 37%. When MLD was added to the intensive course of compression bandaging, their swelling went down another 7.11%. Thus, MLD may offer benefit when added to compression bandaging. Examining this finding more closely showed that this significant reduction benefit was observed in people with mild-to-moderate lymphedema when compared to participants with moderate-to-severe lymphedema. Thus, our findings suggest that individuals with mild-to-moderate BCRL are the ones who may benefit from adding MLD to an intensive course of treatment with compression bandaging. This finding, however, needs to be confirmed by further research. When women were given a standard elastic compression sleeve plus MLD and compared to women who received a standard compression sleeve plus a nonMLD treatment, results were mixed (sometimes favoring MLD and sometimes favoring neither treatment.) One-year follow-up suggests that once swelling had been reduced, participants were likely to keep their swelling down if they continued to use a custom-made sleeve. MLD is safe and well tolerated. Findings were contradictory for function (range of motion), with one trial showing benefit and the other not. Two trials measured quality of life, but neither trial presented results comparing the treatment group to the control, so findings are inconclusive. No trial measured cost of care. Quality of the Evidence Trials were small ranging from 24 to 45 participants. Most trials appeared to randomize participants adequately. However, in four trials the person measuring the swelling knew what treatment the participants were receiving, and this could have biased results. Authors' conclusions: MLD is safe and may offer additional benefit to compression bandaging for swelling reduction. Compared to individuals with moderate-to-severe BCRL, those with mild-to-moderate BCRL may be the ones who benefit from adding MLD to an intensive course of treatment with compression bandaging. This finding, however, needs to be confirmed by randomized data. In trials where MLD and sleeve were compared with a nonMLD treatment and sleeve, volumetric outcomes were inconsistent within the same trial. Research is needed to identify the most clinically meaningful volumetric measurement, to incorporate newer technologies in LE assessment, and to assess other clinically relevant outcomes such as fibrotic tissue formation. Findings were contradictory for function (range of motion), and inconclusive for quality of life. For symptoms such as pain and heaviness, 60% to 80% of participants reported feeling better regardless of which treatment they received. One-year follow-up suggests that once swelling had been reduced, participants were likely to keep their swelling down if they continued to use a custom-made sleeve.
dc.publisherThe Cochrane Collaboration
dc.relation.ispartofCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
dc.titleManual lymph drainage for lymphedema following breast cancer treatment
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysch_nur
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.1002/14651858.CD003475.pub2
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4539
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2014-11-01
refterms.dateFCA2016-09-26
refterms.dateFCD2016-09-22
qmu.authorWilliams, Anne F.
dc.description.statuspub


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