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dc.contributor.authorDavie-Smith, F.
dc.contributor.authorCoulter, Elaine H.
dc.contributor.authorKennon, B.
dc.contributor.authorWyke, A.
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Lorna
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:46:06Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:46:06Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-02
dc.identifierER4554
dc.identifier.citationDavie-Smith, F., Coulter, E., Kennon, B., Wyke, A. & Paul, L. (2017) Factors influencing quality of life following non-traumatic lower extremity amputation: a systematic review of the literature, Prosthetics and Orthotics International, , , ,
dc.identifier.issn0309-3646, ESSN: 1746-1553
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1177/0309364617690394
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4554
dc.description.abstractBackground: The majority of lower limb amputations are undertaken in people with peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and approximately 50% have diabetes. Quality of life is an important outcome in lower limb amputations; little is known about what influences it, and therefore how to improve it. Objectives: The aim of this systematic review was to identify the factors that influence quality of life after lower limb amputation for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science and Cochrane databases were searched to identify articles that quantitatively measured quality of life in those with a lower limb amputation for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Articles were quality assessed by two assessors, evidence tables summarised each article and a narrative synthesis was performed. Study design: Systematic review. Results: Twelve articles were included. Study designs and outcome measures used varied. Quality assessment scores ranged from 36% to 92%. The ability to walk successfully with a prosthesis had the greatest positive impact on quality of life. A trans-femoral amputation was negatively associated with quality of life due to increased difficulty in walking with a prosthesis. Other factors such as older age, being male, longer time since amputation, level of social support and presence of diabetes also negatively affected quality of life. Conclusion: Being able to walk with a prosthesis is of primary importance to improve quality of life for people with lower limb amputation due to peripheral arterial occlusive disease. To further understand and improve the quality of life of this population, there is a need for more prospective longitudinal studies, with a standardised outcome measure.
dc.publisherSAGE
dc.relation.ispartofProsthetics and Orthotics International
dc.titleFactors influencing quality of life following non-traumatic lower extremity amputation: a systematic review of the literature
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_phy
dc.identifier.doihttp://10.1177/0309364617690394
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4554
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2016-12-14
qmu.authorCoulter, Elaine H.
qmu.centreCentre for Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research
dc.description.statuspub


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