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dc.contributor.authorDall, P. M.
dc.contributor.authorCoulter, Elaine H.
dc.contributor.authorFitzsimons, C. F.
dc.contributor.authorSkelton, D. A.
dc.contributor.authorChastin, SFM
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:44:42Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:44:42Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-08
dc.identifierER4730
dc.identifier.citationDall, P., Coulter, E., Fitzsimons, C., Skelton, D. & Chastin, S. (2017) TAxonomy of Self-reported Sedentary behaviour Tools (TASST) framework for development, comparison and evaluation of self-report tools: content analysis and systematic review, BMJ Open, vol. 7, , pp. e013844,
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013844
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4730
dc.description.abstractObjective Sedentary behaviour (SB) has distinct deleterious health outcomes, yet there is no consensus on best practice for measurement. This study aimed to identify the optimal self-report tool for population surveillance of SB, using a systematic framework. Design A framework, TAxonomy of Self-reported Sedentary behaviour Tools (TASST), consisting of four domains (type of assessment, recall period, temporal unit and assessment period), was developed based on a systematic inventory of existing tools. The inventory was achieved through a systematic review of studies reporting SB and tracing back to the original description. A systematic review of the accuracy and sensitivity to change of these tools was then mapped against TASST domains. Data sources Systematic searches were conducted via EBSCO, reference lists and expert opinion. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies The inventory included tools measuring SB in adults that could be self-completed at one sitting, and excluded tools measuring SB in specific populations or contexts. The systematic review included studies reporting on the accuracy against an objective measure of SB and/or sensitivity to change of a tool in the inventory. Results The systematic review initially identified 32 distinct tools (141 questions), which were used to develop the TASST framework. Twenty-two studies evaluated accuracy and/or sensitivity to change representing only eight taxa. Assessing SB as a sum of behaviours and using a previous day recall were the most promising features of existing tools. Accuracy was poor for all existing tools, with underestimation and overestimation of SB. There was a lack of evidence about sensitivity to change. Conclusions Despite the limited evidence, mapping existing SB tools onto the TASST framework has enabled informed recommendations to be made about the most promising features for a surveillance tool, identified aspects on which future research and development of SB surveillance tools should focus.
dc.format.extente013844
dc.relation.ispartofBMJ Open
dc.titleTAxonomy of Self-reported Sedentary behaviour Tools (TASST) framework for development, comparison and evaluation of self-report tools: content analysis and systematic review
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysch_phy
dc.description.volume7
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013844
dc.description.eprintid4730
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2017-02-03
refterms.dateFCA2017-04-18
refterms.dateFCD2017-04-18
qmu.authorCoulter, Elaine H.
dc.description.number4


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