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dc.contributor.authorBullen, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorMcArdle, Carla
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Mairghread JH
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:48:56Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:48:56Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-28
dc.identifierER4760
dc.identifier.citationBullen, B., Young, M., McArdle, C. & Ellis, M. (3917) Visual and kinaesthetic approaches to pragmatic, person-centred diabetic foot education, The Diabetic Foot Journal, vol. 20, pp. 29-33.
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.diabeticfootjournal.co.uk/journal-content/view/visual-and-kinaesthetic-approaches-to-pragmatic-person-centred-diabetic-foot-education
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4760
dc.description.abstractThis review of clinical practice describes a pragmatic, person-centred approach to diabetic foot education that is sensitive to individual adult service users' learning needs and preferences. National clinical guidance recommends foot education for all people with diabetes in the UK. Evidence for the effectiveness of foot education remains limited, particularly concerning long-term behaviour modification and the prevention of ulceration and amputation. The Scottish Diabetes Foot Action Group produces written diabetic foot information and advice leaflets to support verbal patient education, but this approach may not be suitable for all. Individuals with low health literacy and visual or kinaesthetic learning preferences should also be considered. Readily-available, cost-effective and expedient strategies for inclusive diabetic foot education are presented in this article.
dc.format.extent29-33
dc.publisherWounds Group
dc.relation.ispartofThe Diabetic Foot Journal
dc.titleVisual and kinaesthetic approaches to pragmatic, person-centred diabetic foot education
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultysch_pod
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dc.description.volume20
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4760
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2017-02-28
refterms.dateFCD2017-08-08
qmu.authorEllis, Mairghread JH
qmu.authorBullen, Benjamin
qmu.authorMcArdle, Carla
qmu.centreCentre for Health, Activity and Rehabilitation Research
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number1


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