Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHytiris, Monica Lorraina
dc.contributor.authorPrentice, Fraser
dc.contributor.authorBaldie, Deborah
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:37:16Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:37:16Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-17
dc.identifierER4769
dc.identifier.citationHytiris, M., Prentice, F. & Baldie, D. (2017) Medical students volunteering in hospital: a novel method of exploring and recording the patient experience, International Practice Development Journal, vol. 7, , pp. 01-Aug,
dc.identifier.issn20469292
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.19043/ipdj.71.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.19043/ipdj.71.009
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4769
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patient experience is increasingly recognised as an important feature of healthcare quality improvement. However, many of the methods implemented for its collection have significant limitations and reliability issues. This article describes how a UK healthcare organisation worked with medical student volunteers to build capacity for the collection of patient feedback in evidence-informed ways, and summarises student reflections on this process. Aims: To improve the quantity and quality of inpatient feedback, and in doing so provide new learning opportunities for medical students. Conclusions: Patient feedback gathered by volunteers is beneficial to the service and to medical student volunteers. As the feedback gathered is ward-specific, opportunities are created for practice improvements to be identified and acted on. It is feasible for medical students to be trained effectively as volunteers in gathering patient care experiences with adequate support mechanisms in place. Implications for practice: - Healthcare services should consider the use of personnel independent of the care team for thecollection of patient feedback - Patient feedback needs to be shared with practitioners in a timely manner - Medical schools should consider this type of volunteering as a unique opportunity for medicalstudents to improve understanding of patients' experiences of healthcare, and of how care canbe person-centred
dc.format.extent01-Aug
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Practice Development Journal
dc.subjectReflection
dc.subjectPerson-Centred Care
dc.subjectPractice Development
dc.subjectMedical Student Volunteers
dc.subjectAcute Inpatient Settings
dc.subjectPatient Experience
dc.titleMedical students volunteering in hospital: a novel method of exploring and recording the patient experience
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysch_nur
dc.description.referencetextAhmed, F., Burt, J. and Roland, M. (2014) Measuring patient experience: concepts and methods. The Patient. Vol. 7. No. 3. pp 235-241. doi: 10.1007/s40271-014-0060-5. Davies, E. and Cleary, P. (2005) Hearing the patient's voice? Factors affecting the use of patient survey data in quality improvement. Quality and Safety in Health Care. Vol. 14. No. 6. pp 428-432. doi: 10.1136/qshc.2004.012955. Davies, E., Shaller, D., Edgman-Levitan, S., Safran, D., Oftedahl, G., Sakowski, J. and Cleary, P. (2008) Evaluating the use of a modified CAHPS survey to support improvements in patient-centred care: lessons from a quality improvement collaborative. Health Expectations. Vol. 11. No.2. pp 160-176. doi: 10.1111/j.1369-7625.2007.00483.x. De Silva, D. (2013) Measuring Patient Experience. Retrieved from: tinyurl.com/HF-patientexp (Last accessed 12th January 2017). London: The Health Foundation. De Silva, D. (2014) Helping Measure Person-centred Care. Retrieved from: tinyurl.com/HF-personcentred (Last accessed 12th January 2017). London: The Health Foundation. Dewing, J., McCormack, B. and Titchen, T. (2014) Practice Development Workbook for Nursing, Health and Social Care Teams. Oxford: John Wiley and Sons. Doyle, C., Lennox, L. and Bell, D. (2013) A systematic review of evidence on the links between patient experience and clinical safety and effectiveness. BMJ Open. Vol. 3. No. 1. p.e001570. doi: 10.1136/ bmjopen-2012-001570. Edwards, A., Evans, R., White, P. and Elwyn, G. (2011) Experiencing patient-experience surveys: a qualitative study of the accounts of GPs. British Journal of General Practice. Vol. 61. No. 585. pp 157-166. doi: 10.3399/bjgp11X567072. Entwistle, V., Firnigl, D., Ryan, M., Francis, J. and Kinghorn, P. (2012) Which experiences of health care delivery matter to service users and why? A critical interpretive synthesis and conceptual map. Journal of Health Services Research and Policy. Vol. 17. No. 2. pp 70-78. doi: 10.1258/ jhsrp.2011.011029. Framework for Measuring Impact (2012) The Picker Patient Experience Questionnaire (PPE-15). Retrieved from: tinyurl.com/PPE-15. (Last accessed 9th March 2017). Gibbs, G. (1988) Learning by Doing: A Guide to Teaching and Learning Methods. Oxford: Further Education Unit. Jenkinson, C., Coulter, A. and Bruster, S. (2002) The Picker Patient Experience Questionnaire: Development and validation using data from inpatient surveys in five countries. International Journal for Quality in Health Care. Vol. 14. No. 5. pp 353-358. doi: 0.1093/intqhc/14.5.353. The Authors 2017 International Practice Development Journal 7 (1) [9] fons.org/library/journal.aspx 8 Reeves, R. (2008) Better Together: Scotland's Patient Experience Programme. Building on the Experiences of NHS Boards. Retrieved from: tinyurl.com/scot-better (Last accessed 16th March 2017). Edinburgh: Scottish Government Social Research. Reeves, R. and Seccombe, I. (2008) Do patient surveys work? The influence of a national survey programme on local quality-improvement initiatives. Quality and Safety in Health Care. Vol. 17. No. 6. pp 437-441. doi: 10.1136/qshc.2007.022749. Scottish Government (2011) Patient Rights (Scotland) Act 2011, Section 3. Retrieved from: tinyurl. com/scot-patientact (Last accessed 12th January 2017). Skea, Z., Harry, V., Bhattacharya, S., Entwistle, V., Williams, B., MacLennan, G. and Templeton, A. (2004) Women's perceptions of decision-making about hysterectomy. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Vol. 111. No. 2. pp 133-142. doi: 10.1046/j.1471-0528.2003.00027.x. Williams, B., Coyle, J. and Healy, D. (1998) The meaning of patient satisfaction: an explanation of high reported levels. Social Science and Medicine. Vol. 47. No. 9. pp 1351-1359. doi: 10.1016/S0277- 9536(98)00213-5.
dc.description.volume7
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.19043/ipdj.71.009
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4769
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2017-04-18
refterms.dateFCA2017-08-11
refterms.dateFCD2017-08-11
qmu.authorBaldie, Deborah
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number1


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record