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dc.contributor.authorChong, Ooi Thye
dc.contributor.authorCritchley, Hilary O. D.
dc.contributor.authorHorne, Andrew W.
dc.contributor.authorElton, Robert
dc.contributor.authorHaraldsdottir, Erna
dc.contributor.authorFallon, Marie T.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T21:37:23Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T21:37:23Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-01
dc.identifierER4883
dc.identifier.citationChong, O., Critchley, H., Horne, A., Elton, R., Haraldsdottir, E. & Fallon, M. (2015) The BMEA study: the impact of meridian balanced method electroacupuncture on women with chronic pelvic pain--a three-arm randomised controlled pilot study using a mixed-methods approach, BMJ Open, vol. 5, , ,
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008621
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4883
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) affects 3-4% of women worldwide. Proven treatments for CPP are limited and unsatisfactory. The meridian balance method (BM) electroacupuncture (EA) treatment (BMEA + Traditional Chinese Medicine Health Consultation (TCM HC) may be effective for CPP. Previous EA studies have demonstrated an analgesic effect. Large-scale studies on acupuncture for other chronic pain conditions suggest that patient-healthcare provider interaction might play a role in pain reduction. We propose a pilot study to explore the effectiveness of the meridian BMEA treatment in managing women with CPP to inform a future large randomised controlled trial. Methods and analysis: A 3-armed randomised controlled pilot study is proposed with an aim to recruit 30 women with CPP in National Health Service (NHS) Lothian. Randomisation will be to BMEA treatment, TCM HC or standard care (SC). Validated pain, physical and emotional functioning questionnaires will be administered to all participants at weeks 0, 4, 8 and 12. Focus group discussions will be conducted when week 12 questionnaires are completed. The primary objective is to determine, recruitment and retention rates. The secondary objectives are to assess the effectiveness and acceptability of the proposed methods of recruitment, randomisation, interventions and assessment tools. Ethics and dissemination: Ethical approval has been obtained from the Scotland Research Ethics Committee (REC 14/SS/1022). Data will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at international conferences.
dc.description.abstractOur Research Report for 2000-2002 reflects an outstanding level of achievement throughout the institution and demonstrates once again our high level of commitment to strategic and applied research particularly in areas that enhance the quality of life.
dc.relation.ispartofBMJ Open
dc.titleThe BMEA study: the impact of meridian balanced method electroacupuncture on women with chronic pelvic pain--a three-arm randomised controlled pilot study using a mixed-methods approach
dc.typearticle
dcterms.accessRightspublic
dc.description.facultysch_nur
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dc.description.volume5
dc.identifier.doihttp://doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008621
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4883
rioxxterms.typearticle
refterms.dateAccepted2015-10-22
refterms.dateFCA2017-09-19
refterms.dateFCD2017-09-19
qmu.authorHaraldsdottir, Erna
qmu.centreCentre for Person-centred Practise Research
dc.description.statuspub
dc.description.number11


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