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dc.contributor.authorMapson, Rachel
dc.contributor.editorArchibald, Alasdair N.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T15:54:01Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T15:54:01Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifierER4933
dc.identifier.citationMapson, R. (2013) Politeness in British Sign Language: the effects of language contact, pp. 167-170, London.
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-9559533-5-4
dc.identifier.urihttps://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/handle/20.500.12289/4933
dc.identifier.urihttps://baal.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/proceedings_2012.pdf
dc.descriptionLondon
dc.description.abstractIn the UK, language contact issues are reflected in the use of British Sign Language (BSL) in a society dominated by the use of English. The effects of language contact on BSL are a legacy of linguistic suppression and have sometimes been described in terms of a continuum, representing the differing degrees of linguistic influence from English (Lawson, 1981). This influence may result in syntactic and lexical alterations in the way BSL is performed, with English borrowings occurring either through the use of fingerspelled words or the adoption of English mouthings to accompany manual signs (Sutton-Spence, 1999). This paper discusses some of these effects as they pertain to linguistic politeness in BSL. The research forms part of a study designed to address the deficit in research into politeness in BSL by exploring what politeness looks like in BSL and the influences on the way in which it is performed.
dc.format.extent167-170
dc.publisherScitsiugnil Press
dc.relation.ispartofMultilingual Theory and Practice in Applied Linguistics, Proceedings of the 45th Annual Meeting of the British Association for Applied Linguistics
dc.titlePoliteness in British Sign Language: the effects of language contact
dc.typebook_section
dcterms.accessRightsrestricted
dc.description.facultycasl
dc.description.referencetextJack Hoza. 2007. It's Not What you Sign, it's How you Sign it: Politeness in American Sign Language. Gallaudet University Press: Washington, DC. Lilian Lawson. 1981. The Role of Sign in the Structure of the Deaf Community. In Susan Gregory and Gillian Hartley (eds), Constructing Deafness. Open University: London, pp31-34 Daniel Roush. 1999. Indirectness Strategies in American Sign Language: Requests and Refusals. Gallaudet University MA dissertation: Washington, DC. Rachel Sutton-Spence. 1999. The Influence of English on British Sign Language. In International Journal of Bilingualism Vol 3(4) 1999, pp363-394.
dc.description.ispublishedpub
dc.description.eprintid4933
rioxxterms.typebook_section
refterms.dateFCD2017-10-09
qmu.authorMapson, Rachel
qmu.centreCASL
qmu.centreCASLen
dc.description.statuspub


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